Thursday, August 30, 2018

Those Places Thursday: 2880 NW Ariel Terrace, Portland, Oregon, Interiors - An Ewald Pape Design

Recently the current owner of 2880 NW Ariel Terrace in Portland, Oregon, a house designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1930, sent me over 100 beautiful photos of her home, primarily the interior.

Here are just a few of them, that focus on some of the interesting features that Ewald included in the home.  You can click on each photo to make it larger.  All photos are courtesy Diedre Dame and used with her permission:


Above and below:  Views of the main floor's 22' by 34' living room, and looking out onto the terrace.  Note the arched doorways and curved windows, one of the home's three fireplaces, and the wonderful woodwork on the window.  The owner tells me all windows in the house are original and leaded glass.




Above:  Another view of the fireplace in the sunken living room, looking towards the entrance foyer (towards the left) and the main staircase (straight ahead).

Below:  The beautiful wrought-iron banister curving staircase - note the little room off the first landing.  The owner tells me this was the office of the original owner, Alvin Greenwood. "There is a built in oak cupboard where he kept all his drawings and blueprints..... Very unique feature!"  He was a highway construction engineer.



Above:  Yet another view of the curving wooden staircase, as well as some of the niches and built-in shelving in the foyer area.  You can also see into the open door of the den, to the left of the staircase

Below:  Large niche just off the front entry; staircase and first landing room visible on the right.




Above:  View of the curving staircase and first landing room from the upper landing.

Below:  The second of three fireplaces in the house, this one in the main floor den.



Ewald did not design either of these next two features, but I had to include them because I love them!


Above:  Library on the lower level.  There is mention of a library in the house in real estate ads from 1972, but it (and the adjacent recreation room) apparently went into the space that was originally the ballroom.

Below:  A fountain on the terrace that adds to the Mediterranean atmosphere of the home.  Current owner Diedre Dame designed this gorgeous item.



text © Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, August 26, 2018

Sentimental Church (Record) Sunday: St. Jerome Catholic Church, Rogers Park, Chicago

St. Jerome Catholic Church, at 1709 W. Lunt Avenue in the Rogers Park area of Chicago, is the church where my Pape grandparents, Paul Robert Pape (1896-1970) and Elizabeth Florence Massmann (1902-2000), were married on September 3, 1926.  Here are some photos I took of the church during a visit to Chicago in August 2017 - click on each to make it larger:



St. Jerome was established in 1894, with a wooden church constructed at the nearby intersection of W. Morse Avenue and N. Paulina Street, now the location of the convent building.    The current building was constructed in 1916 at the corner of Lunt and Paulina.



The exterior is described as North Italian Renaissance (or Italianate Romanesque) style, and was designed by noted architect Charles H. Prindeville (who also designed another church important to my family, St. Vincent de Paul).  In 1934, the church was enlarged, with plans by another well-known church architect, Joseph W. McCarthy.  The expansion gave the church the longest central aisle of any Catholic church in Chicago.



Here is how the interior of the church looked from its construction in 1916 until 1931 - this photograph likely taken in the late 1910s.  This is how the church probably looked when my grandparents were married there.

 (Postcard courtesy John Chuckman's Chicago Nostalgia and Memorabilia site.)

This next photo of the interior is by Eric Allix Rogers, who took a number of other photos of the interior of the church for the 2015 and 2016 Open House Chicago tours sponsored by the Chicago Architecture Center.
St. Jerome Roman Catholic Church [8 May 2015] / Eric Allix Rogers / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The interior frescoes and other decorations were done by Czech immigrant John A. Mallin in 1931 and 1934.  McCarthy added the colored marble Art Deco inspired altar in his renovation.  My picture below is dark because the lights were out in the church when I took it - I only had the light from the stained glass windows to illuminate it.  I was lucky to get inside the church at all to take the next two photos - a staff member kindly let me in for a few moments.



These stained glass windows are above the altar.



More photographs of the interior are on the parish website, and on a website about John Mallin.

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Friday, August 24, 2018

Friday's Faces From the Past: Happy Birthday, Breathless!


My sweetie Mark on one of his birthdays - probably around 1950.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Sentimental Sunday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design: Details

As mentioned in a previous post, a few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She lives at the Rosegate Condominiums in Portland, Oregon, formerly the Beacon Hill Apartments, which were designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

Not only did Gina send me some photos of the inner courtyard, she also sent some interior shots of her condo.  This post, I'm featuring some of the details in her unit.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.


Above:  Dining room chandelier.  Below:  Living room light fixture.
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




Above:  Close-up of dining room hutch.  Below:  Door hardware.
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Another resident named Nancy e-mailed me about the Rosegate in 2015.  She told me they were converted from apartments to condominiums in 1999, and that she was one of the original purchasers of a condo.  She said,

"At the time his apartment was converted to condos the Oregonian covered the project as it was the first vintage apartment to have a conversion. The developer retained all of the charm of the original features like door knockers, downstairs electric chandeliers while upgrading them to code.

Within 5 years many apartments across Portland followed suit."

She later wrote,

"Each unit has a quirk making it completely unique from each other apartment townhouse."

Gina sent me the following picture of a page from the 1999 sales brochure, showing the floor plan for unit 1, a three-bedroom:



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Inside the Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Hill Apartments, An Ewald Pape Design

As mentioned in my previous post, a few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She lives at the Rosegate Condominiums in Portland, Oregon, formerly the Beacon Hill Apartments, which were designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

Not only did Gina send me some photos of the inner courtyard, she also sent some interior shots of her condo.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.


Above and below:  "Living room facing Halsey."  
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Above and below:  "Rosegate dining room -  
I love the arched entry wall, original leaded glass hutch, and chandelier."  Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Below:  "Cute little kitchen - Original cabinets but reproduction floor and counter tile."  Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Below:  "Bedroom" Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.  Gina lives in the only one bedroom, single-story unit in the complex, which she theorizes was probably originally the office and apartment of the manager when the complex was the Beacon Arms Apartments.



An ad for an open house for the new apartments in the July 26, 1931 Oregonian gives the following description:
Spacious living rooms, 14x22; wrought iron stair rails, curtain and drape rods, guest closet, corner cupboard in dining room.
Large bedrooms, well arranged; ample closet space, through ventilation.  Baths with pattern tile.
Complete kitchens designed by women.  Westinghouse chrome top stoves, individual General Electric refrigerators, exhaust fans.
Steam heat, recessed radiation, and hot water furnished.
Lockers, washing machines, clotheslines and showers in basement.

More photos of some of the interior details on Sunday!

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Sentimental Sunday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design: Courtyard

A few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She wrote:

I live in a beautiful building that was designed by E.T. Pape.  It's the Rosegate Condominiums at 4353 NE Halsey.  I have lived here for 15 years, but have loved the building since I first discovered it back in the 1980s.  I used to live next door, and always told my sister how much I'd love to live in this building someday.  And here I am, a home owner at Rosegate.  I did some research with the Oregonian archives on line and discovered a great photograph of the building from July 26, 1931.  There's also a nice article from Feb. 15, 1931, that describes the building with the headline "Apartments to Rise, Modern Structure designed by E.T. Pape."  The building was originally called The Beacon Arms.  It was so much fun discovering more about this beautiful building's history, and I was thrilled to discover your family blog and discover even more about the wonderful man who designed our building.  His gorgeous & thoughtful architecture has inspired me to seek out his other Portland buildings and homes.  Thanks for posting so many of them on your web site.  And the Black Sheep post [about Ewald's alien case file) was heartbreaking to read.  How terribly we have treated immigrants, yesterday & today.

When Gina found out I'd only been able to take pictures from the outer (street) side of the building, she offered to send me some photos of the inner courtyard.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.

"Our beautiful fountain - The fountain is in the center of the courtyard."
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




A July 26, 1931 article in the Oregonian entitled "New Apartments Ready" had "Landscaping is Feature" in its subtitle, and a whole paragraph on the topic:

"Landscaping of the project, which is built around an open garden plot, is extensive.  Rock gardens, grass plots, shrubbery clumps and a large pool with double waterfall are included in the landscaping scheme."  It appears some of the landscaping has changed a little over the years, but that has not diminished its loveliness.


"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking Northeast"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




Later ads (such as March 21, 1932) described the three-quarter acre as "landscaped as large estate" and (July 19. 1932) "new apt. bldg. is a home both inside and out.  Pools, shrubbery, rockeries, garages and private driveway, are some of the details..."


"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking East"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking Southeast"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"North Lawn - Looking South from North lawn, with fountain just past Japanese Maple"Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"South lawn - looking northeast from south lawn"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



The July 26, 1931 Oregonian article mentioned that the "apartment is of modern American design, and is of brick with tiled roof," but didn't mention the leaded glass windows, some of which still exist in some apartments.





Above and below:  "Leaded glass windows" - 
photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"Front door door knocker - Little window opens from inside to see who’s at the door."  Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



So what's inside the door?  Check out the next post, this coming Thursday!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design.





This lovely building is part of a fourteen-unit apartment-turned-condominium in Portland, Oregon, designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

The first mention I could find of the structure was an article entitled "Apartments to Rise" in the Sunday, February 15, 1931, Portland Oregonian.  It lists E. T. Pape as the designer and indicates the east side structure will cost $85,000.  It will have fourteen five- and six-room suites, and was to be constructed for Albert E. Bartell "at East Forty-fifth North [now NE 45th Avenue] and [NE] Halsey streets."  Frank E. Knapp was the builder.

Here's the plumbing permit, dated March 6, 1931.  The original address was 1263 Halsey, after Portland's street renumbering/renaming in 1932-34, it became 4353 NE Halsey:



The Oregonian article goes on to describe the units as "having living rooms and kitchens on the first floor and bedrooms and baths upstairs.  Each apartment will have its individual entrance." The building itself "will be 50x180 in dimensions, two stories in height, with two wings 34x78.  Exterior will be of brick."




A July 26, 1931 Oregonian article on page 2 titled "New Apartments Ready" notes the tiled roof and that it "has the advantage of a complete home in that the individual apartments...have both front and rear entrances."  Entrances fronting on Halsey street can be seen in the photograph below.



Interestingly, there's a separate building (visible at left in the photo above with the entrance gate) that is apparently part of the condominium complex, but that wasn't described in the February 15 article.  You can see from the photo below that it is not quite as ornate:



This building has the address 4341, and I'm not completely sure if Ewald designed it or not.  Its plumbing permit is not available online, and it isn't referenced in the July 26, 1931 Oregonian article, which only mentions the fourteen units.  However, a February 17, 1931 Oregonian article on page 18 called "Projects In Portland To Involve $188,500" describes the apartment building as "U-shaped, 187 feet long and 87 feet wide on the ends.  It will have 22 apartments."  The U-shaped building is 4353 and has 14 units, 1 through 15 (13 is skipped).  This rectangular building, 4341, has six units, numbers 16 through 21.

The July 26, 1931 article has a photograph of the U-shaped building, and notes that it has no name.  However, by January 24, 1932, ads are appearing in the Oregonian calling it The Beacon Arms.  That name disappears from the Oregonian after the building was sold in July 1942.  In 1999, the buildings were converted to condominiums and named "The Rosegate."




I was recently contacted by a current resident of the complex, who offered to take some additional photographs for me (since it's a gated community).  Come back on Sunday to see her stunning photos of the Rosegate's gorgeous courtyard.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Friday's Faces From the Past: Happy Birthday to My Brother Mark!



My brother Mark on his First Communion Day, spring 1967


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.