Sunday, March 31, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: "Fishing ? on Miss River" - Winona, Minnesota, October 1951

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a number of old black-and-white photos from the early and mid-1950s.  Some of them appear to have been taken by his father, my Grandpa, Paul Robert Pape (1896-1970), and may have been sent to my dad during his time in Korea.  Grandpa put numbers on the front of the images, and also wrote captions on the back.  The caption on this one said, "At Winona Minn fishing ? on Miss River Oct 1951."



The woman on the left is my aunt, Dad's sister Marilyn Electa Pape Hedger.  The woman on the right is her mother, my grandmother, Elizabeth Florence Massmann Pape (1902-2000).  Marilyn is wearing the same outfit (and the background is the same) as in another undated photo of her and Grandpa, so this photo helped me date that one.

Marilyn attended the College of Saint Teresa in Winona around this time, so that is probably why they were there.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 3733 NE 28th Avenue, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

 Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 3733 NE 28th Avenue, on the corner of NE Hamblet Street.  At the time I viewed it, it was surrounded by trees in full summer foliage, so I borrowed this photograph from a 2015 real estate ad to better show the front of the home (click on each image to view it larger):




The first mention I found of the house was an article in the March 24, 1935 Oregonian, called "Six Permits for Construction of Homes Issued," about building permits issued the previous week.  It includes this:  "Two-story house costing $9500 at 3733 Northeast Twenty-eighth avenue to Frank A. Read."

Here is the plumbing permit from PortlandMaps, dated March 29, 1935.  The house originally had two bathrooms:



This house is listed in the Oregon Historic Sites Database and the City of Portland Historic Resource Inventory as the Joseph P. and Mildred Tarvola [sic, it should be Tarola] House.  Tarola owned the Tarola Motor Car Company (a Chrysler Plymouth dealership) and his daughter Mary Jo was a beauty queen and actress who later married movie producer and alleged mobster Pat DiCicco and then baseball star "Hammerin' Hank" Greenberg.  The Tarola family lived in the house through at least 1943, but had apparently moved by 1950.

The Inventory categorizes the Tudor Revival house as architecturally significant, and lists the following special features and materials:

Hip roof with gabled pavilion.  Mock half-timbering and brick exterior.  Brick corbeling on chimney.  Tudor arch door opening.  Casement windows.

The photo below is from the Inventory and was probably taken about May 1981:



As mentioned above, it was hard to photograph this house for all the trees.  Here is one end of the home, where a bay window is visible on the main floor.  The house has approximately 3,002 square feet and sits on a 5,800 square-foot lot.



This is a view of the home from the Hamblet street side.  In April 1936, Joseph Tarola applied for a plumbing permit to add a third bathroom above the garage.  At some later point, a half-bath was added in the basement, and in 2017 a shower was added to that.


This property overview is from the aforementioned real estate listing (which also includes some interior photographs) of February 9, 2015:

Elegant Tudor in prime Alameda location! Formal entry with gorgeous staircase,amazing natural light thru out. Spacious floor-plan with grand rooms. Original character including leaded glass,built ins, hardwood floors. Coveted floor plan with 3 bedrooms up and 4th or den/office on main. Lower level family room with fireplace. Lovely outdoor patio, garden, beautiful camellias, azaleas, rhododendrons and flowering crab apple.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Sunday, March 24, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: "My two Sweetie Pies" - Winona, Minnesota, October 1951

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a number of old black-and-white photos from the early and mid-1950s.  Some of them appear to have been taken by his father, my Grandpa, Paul Robert Pape (1896-1970), and may have been sent to my dad during his time in Korea.  Grandpa put numbers on the front of the images, and also wrote captions on the back.  The caption on this one said, "At Winona Minn Oct 1951 My two Sweetie Pies."



The woman on the left is my grandmother, Elizabeth Florence Massmann Pape (1902-2000).  The woman on the right is my aunt, Dad's sister Marilyn Electa Pape Hedger.  Grandpa referred to her in other pictures as "Sweetie Pie."

Marilyn attended the College of Saint Teresa in Winona around this time, so that is probably why they were there.

I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 4510 NE Alameda, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 4510 NE Alameda St, on the corner of NE Wiberg Lane (click on each image to view it larger):




The first mention I found of the house was an article in the May 20, 1934 Oregonian, called "Four Projects Advance," about building permits issued the previous week.  It includes this:  "Frank A. Read will build a two-story house costing $7500 at 4510 Northeast Alameda,...Plans were prepared by E. T. Pape..."

Here is the plumbing permit from PortlandMaps, dated June 18, 1934.  The house originally had two bathrooms.



This house is listed in the Oregon Historic Sites Database and the City of Portland Historic Resource Inventory as the Frank A. and Mae Read House, although it doesn't appear that they ever lived there.  The Inventory categorizes the Tudor Revival house as architecturally significant, and lists the following special features and materials:

Steeply pitched irregular hip roof.  Mock half-timbering and brick exterior.  Leaded-glass windows.  Gabled dormer.  Brackets.  Curvilinear arched entrance.  Stepped chimney.

The photo below is from the Inventory and was probably taken about May 1981:



Despite its location on a corner, it was hard to see much of this house, due to the landscaping, including a tall hedge along the side.  An article in the July 23, 1939 Oregonian indicated that P[ier] D. Rollandet (who lived in the house from about 1938 to about 1942) won first prize in the amateur division that week in the Oregonian's "Outdoor Living" contest.  The article stated,
Mr. Rollandet's terrace is located next to the back porch of his home and is bounded by a tall hedge.  A short flight of steps leads from the terrace to stepping stones on the broad lawn.  A feature...is a tall, perfectly shaped tulip tree, which provides shade for the terrace.


A real estate ad in the February 1, 1942 Oregonian indicates that the house had four bedrooms, one downstairs and three upstairs, with a bathroom on each floor, and a "spacious entry."



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: Happy Birthday to My Sister Karen!



Picture above from her birthday party in 1965, 8015 Sharpview, Houston, Texas.



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 4608 NE 36th Avenue, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 4608 NE 36th Avenue, on the corner of Going Street, which is the view below (click on each image to view it larger):




According to an article on page 20 of the November 5, 1933 Portland Oregonian, "William K. Haug was granted a permit for a $4500 one-story house to be constructed at 4608 Northeast Thirty-sixth avenue for which E. T. Pape prepared the plans."

One week later, on page 20 of the November 12 issue of the Oregonian, an article entitled "Enterlock Home Rising - First Building in Portland Made of New Type of Lumber" said,

The first home in Portland to be build of "Enterlock" lumber, a product of the Long-Bell Lumber Sales corporation, will be under construction this week at Northeast Thirty-sixth avenue and Going street under the supervision of E. T. Pape, designer.  The house is being built for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Haug.
Enterlock is a new machine preparation of the unit parts which go to make up a building, systematized in such a manner that any type of home building, regardless of plan and architectural treatment, may be built.
The public is invited to inspect the building of this house, the lumber for which is being furnished by the Rowell Lumber company.  I. M. Phelps is the contracting builder.

Here is the plumbing permit from PortlandMaps, dated November 27, 1933:



 Four months later, an article appeared in the March 25, 1934 Oregonian, entitled "Enterlock Home Built - House of Special Fabricated Design Constructed Here"

The first home in Portland to be built by Enterlock fabricated lumber, manufactured by the Long-Bell Lumber company of Longview, Wash., has been completed at 4608 Northeast Thirty-sixth avenue for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Haug.  The cost was $4500.
Construction of the house was supervised by E. T. Pape, designer of homes.  All of the lumber going into the construction is kiln dried and dovetailed together, making a perfect fit and automatically making all walls and ceilings square.
Mr. and Mrs. Haug expect to occupy their new home about April 1.

Here is a view of the home from the 36th Avenue side.  I'm not sure if the porte cochere, which has a deck on top of it, is original to the site:



Edward A. Laughlin of Port Arthur, Texas, invented Enterlock before World War I, and it was patented in 1923.  Here is a sketch from the article "Lock-Joined Lumber for Building" in The Wood-Worker, Volume 38, June 1919 edition, pages 35-36, that illustrates how the pieces of lumber interlock:


Here's a close-up of the front door:



As of 2013, this house only had two owners.  Haug was still living in the house at his death in 1952.  A real estate ad in August 1963 indicates the owners have "bought in Oswego."  This description is from a June 4, 2013 real estate ad:

"Truly charming, sunny & well maintained 1934 custom built home w/ only 2 owners. Hi ceilings, leaded glass, hrdwds thru out, updated kitchen w/ granite, Marmoleum, S/S appl. [stainless steel appliances] & eat area. Extremely solid construction. Newer mechanicals. Super high ceilings make this huge basement ideal for finishing."

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: "Sweetie Pie and Der Herr" - Winona, Minnesota, ABT October 1951

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a number of old black-and-white photos from the early and mid-1950s.  Some of them appear to have been taken by his father, my Grandpa, Paul Robert Pape (1896-1970), and may have been sent to my dad during his time in Korea.  Grandpa put numbers on the front of the images, and also wrote captions on the back.  The caption on this one said, "At Winona Minn Sweetie Pie and Der Herr."



The woman in the picture is my aunt, Dad's sister Marilyn Electa Pape Hedger.  I'm guessing Grandpa's nickname for her was "Sweetie Pie."  Grandpa is on the right.  I guess his nickname was "Der Herr" ("The Man" in German).

Another photo with the same background, also taken in Winona, is dated October 1951, so I'm guessing this photo is from the same time.  Marilyn went to college in Winona about this time, so that is probably why they were there.

I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 3517 E Burnside, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1932.  This one is located at 3517 E Burnside, but unfortunately I only have a few photographs of it (click on each image to view it larger):




The house was apparently a speculative build by Frank A. Read, a prominent residence construction contractor in Portland.  A March 24, 1932 Oregonian article listed the building permit for what was then 1075 E. Burnside for a house valued at $10,500.  Here's the plumbing permit from PortlandMaps, dated April 22, 1932.  The original house had two bathrooms.



Ads for the house started appearing in the Oregonian in August 1932, continuing through April 1933.  The descriptions included "magnificent new 7-rm. English home," "overlooking Laurelhurst Park," '4 bedrms., 2 baths, oil heat, party room," "price $12,500," "elegant," "large grounds," "colonial, outstanding in appearance, faultless in construction," "superior in design and workmanship," and "recreation room; most efficient oil-heating system; lot 75x100."




A drawing of the house appears on page 18 of the August 27, 1933, Oregonian, with this caption: "NEW HOME ERECTED IN LAURELHURST - This attractive ten-room house has [sic] just completed for Dr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Staub, at 3517 Northeast Burnside street, adjacent to Laurelhurst Park. The English Tudor theme was used by the designer, E. T. Pape, with a harmonious blending of stucco, stone, brick, and timber. Appointed construction was by Frank Read, builder, with landscaping by George L. Beltz."   I think the better terminology would have been "has just been sold" rather than "completed," as the house had been for sale for a year at this point.  It's likely the Depression made it hard to sell.


Dr. Staub and his family lived in the house through at least January 1951, but were gone by September 1953.  The house suffered $2300 in damage in a fire in October 1941, and a small addition was made to the rear of the house to enlarge the kitchen in 2002-2003, bringing it to 4,394 square feet.




The house is included in the National Register of Historic Places nomination of the Laurelhurst Historic District.  Comments about the house include:  "Upper story windows replaced, second-story addition to east elevation.  Cross gable roof with no eaves and steep asymmetrical pitch over recessed entry. Entry surround and one lower bay have stone facing. Also some half-timbering on an upper level area of the front.  Attached garage not original."


© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Sunday, March 3, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: "Sweetie Pie doing a little posing" - Winona, Minnesota, ABT October 1951

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a number of old black-and-white photos from the early and mid-1950s.  Some of them appear to have been taken by his father, my Grandpa, Paul Robert Pape (1896-1970), and may have been sent to my dad during his time in Korea.  Grandpa put numbers on the front of the images, and also wrote captions on the back.  The caption on this one said, "Winona Minn Sweetie Pie doing a little posing."



The woman in the picture is my aunt, Dad's sister Marilyn Electa Pape Hedger.  I'm guessing Grandpa's nickname for her was "Sweetie Pie."  Sweetie Pie's birthday is tomorrow.

Another photo from the same roll, also taken in Winona, is dated October 1951, so I'm guessing this photo is from the same time.  Marilyn attended the College of Saint Teresa in Winona around this time, so that is probably why they were there.

I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!