Sunday, February 17, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: Dad and Nana, Chicago, ABT 1952-1954

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a paper bag containing a number of Kodachrome slides from the early and mid-1950s, taken during his time in Korea and also in Chicago and Evanston, Illinois.  Kodachrome is extremely stable, and the color on these slides is near pristine. I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

This photo is of my grandmother, Elizabeth Florence Massmann Pape (1902-2000) and my dad.  This is an enlargement out of the original.




Here is the original photo.  I'm not sure what building is in the background, or even in what city this was taken, just that is is from the early 1950s.



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 2029 NE Knott, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 2029 NE Knott, but unfortunately I don't have many photographs of it (click on each image to view it larger):



An article in the August 23, 1931, Oregonian entitled "$15,000 Residence Planned - George S. Lewis Obtains Permit for House on East Side" states:

A permit has been issued at the city hall for a $15,000 house for George S. Lewis, to be built at East Twenty-first North and Knott streets.  E. T. Pape is the designer, Shand & Reager the builders, and William Schaumann the landscape architect.
The house will be of the Mediterranean type, two stories in height and will contain eight rooms with a ballroom in the basement.  Ground floor dimensions are 52x30.  Oil heat will be used.

Here is the plumbing permit, dated August 27, 1931:



Here's a sketch of the house that appeared in the Oregonian on December 13, 1931, when the house was nearly complete:



Ewald had most recently worked with builders Alex Shand and A. S. Reager on the Portland Women's Realty Board Demonstration Home at 2805 SE Knapp



George S. Lewis was born Giorgios Liozos in Greece in 1887, and immigrated to Philadelphia in January 1903.  By June 1917, he was in Oregon, working as a cook and chief steward on ships, and began using the name George S. Lewis.  By 1930 he owned at least one restaurant, and eventually acquired more, including one located in the bus depot, and Biff's Seafood Restaurant.  He and his family are listed at this address in the 1943 city directory, but by the 1950 directory, they've moved elsewhere.



The house was listed in a real estate ad in the Oregonian on October 22, 1950, with features such as a "breakfast nook and den, 2 set plmb., 2 fireplaces, oil heat, 2-car garage, mahogany finish, 50x100 lot, sprinkling system."


Here is a description of the 3,246 square foot house from a recent real estate listing (there are some interior photos available at the link as well):

"This beautiful Spanish Colonial home designed by E.T. Pape is a custom building that has been meticulously maintained and upgraded over the years, with very few owners. Perfection throughout and features such as Spanish stucco exterior, wrought iron railings, two fireplaces, plenty of hardwoods and designer paint treatments. There is a private enclosed courtyard that feels like you are sitting in a Barcelona villa.

From the entryway you are taken to a large living room with a fireplace and plenty of south facing windows. Also on the main level is a fabulous office with space for a desk that has a great view of the neighborhood, a full 1930s bathroom, large beautiful dining room and an absolutely perfect new kitchen. The design of the kitchen was careful to stem directly from the beautiful built-ins in the adjoining breakfast nook. Everything from the tile, cabinets, surfaces and appliances conveys a perfect mix of modern amenities along with 1930s charm. The breakfast nook looks out directly onto the private courtyard. The grand staircase leads to a large landing and the three bedrooms and bathroom upstairs. All rooms have plenty of light and privacy. A real bonus is the fully finished basement, including a very nice office, great storage, laundry room and a large media/family room with windows, built-ins, theater area and a fireplace. There is a garage off of 21st onto the property."

The garage is visible below, in this view of the house from the NE 21st Avenue side.  Apparently the ballroom in the basement is gone.




This house is considered a contributing resource to the Irvington Historic District, on the National Register of Historic Places.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Monday, February 11, 2019

Military Monday: Kodachrome in Korea VI

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a paper bag containing a number of Kodachrome slides from the early and mid-1950s, taken during his time in Korea and also in Chicago and Evanston, Illinois. Kodachrome is extremely stable, and the color on these slides is near pristine. I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

This picture is from Dad's time in Korea, from October 1952 through March 1953.  I'm not sure if it was taken in Seoul, South Korea, or in Tokyo, Japan, on an R&R (rest and relaxation) leave.



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 2805 SE Knapp, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another house that was definitely designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 2805 SE Knapp, but unfortunately I don't have many photographs of it (click on each image to view it larger):




I was surprised to find that this house is *not* listed in the Oregon Historic Sites Database, nor in the 1984 Portland Historic Resources Inventory.  Surprised, because the house was the Portland Women's Realty Board Demonstration Home in 1931:




Page 24 of the February 22, 1931, Portland Oregonian has a sketch (above) by "E.T. Pape" (his signature and the year 1931 are clearly visible in the lower right-hand corner) of a home "at the northeast corner of East Twenty-eighth street and Knapp avenue" "in the Eastmoreland district."

The house was commissioned "by the Portland Women's Realty Board to show what may be done for $12,000 in this city when it comes to attractive, practical homes."  The Portland Women's Realty board was formed in 1921 in response to the Portland Realty Bureau’s exclusion of women and non-white men from membership.

The Oregon Daily Journal of the same date described the house as a “two-story structure of English architecture. Its design will incorporate the latest equipment for homes and fine interior finish. The plan provides for eight major rooms.”

Here is the plumbing permit, dated April 6, 1931.  Alex Shand was the owner/builder, and his wife Mary was on the demonstration home committee.


Construction went quickly.  The June 7, 1931, Oregonian, on page 26, says, "The house designed by Mr. Pape for the Portland Women's Realty board is now nearing completion ... and will be open to the public June 14 for inspection."

Subsequent ads in the paper indicate that it was open for viewing from 10 a.m to 10 p.m. on Sundays, and in the afternoons and evenings on weekdays.  It generated a lot of interest, according to a Sunday, July 5, 1931, Oregonian article, and remained open for viewing at least through the end of that week.





An architectural survey for a proposed Eastmoreland Historic District describes the house as a Tudor Revival Period Cottage with "a steeply pitched façade gable, clinker brick veneer cladding, decorative half-timbering, and tall, narrow window groupings. Brick veneer is the dominant exterior cladding on the first story, while raked cedar shingle and stucco comprise the second story. The complex gable-on-hip roof displays a prominent façade gable and secondary gable at the west elevation, facing SE 28th Avenue. All of the windows are original wood sash and fixed windows, including a large picture window at the west elevation. The windows on the first story retain their original weathered brick, rowlock-bond sills. The house has one exterior stone chimney, with three clay chimney pots, straddling the dominant roofline."  Some of its details include a projecting front room (pictured above), and an asymmetric central entry and stone entry portal (pictured below).




It doesn't appear to have been altered on the outside, and a real estate listing from 2014 indicates that the house has 3873 square feet , "leaded glass, original woodwork, built-ins and grand staircase.  Desired floorplan w/ 3 spacious bedrooms upstairs, including a grand master suite w/ fireplace, window bench and bath. Hardwoods throughout, formal entry, elegant living/dining areas."




Although originally built with two bathrooms, it now has three.  Real estate ads from 1931 indicate it originally had four bedrooms and a party room, so I think two bedrooms upstairs were combined to make the "grand master suite," and a bedroom was added in the basement (since the 2014 ad lists a fourth bedroom).  The single-car garage (pictured below) is on the side of the house, which sits on a corner lot. 



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Sunday, February 3, 2019

Sentimental Sunday: Fred Pape at Work, in the Early 1960s

Fred Pape at work Jack Frucella Bill Joyner, early 1960s

On the back of this picture, my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), on the left in the photo above, wrote that the other two men were Jack Frucella and Bill Joyner.  They are at work at American General Life Insurance Company in Houston.

John James "Jack" Frucella (1936-1986) was an actuary with American General from 1960 to 1970.  He then moved to Austin, and in 1975 purchased the Hill Country Life Insurance Company in Austin, which he operated until his untimely death in a boating accident on Dad's birthday in 1986. (This information is from an obituary at the Society of Actuaries.)

Billy Norris "Bill" Joyner (1932-2011) was also an actuary.  By 1966, he was working for another insurance company, and had a long career in that industry.

What made me think of this picture was a recent message on Dad's memorial page, from a gentleman named Gerald Bluhm of Katy, Texas.  He wrote,

I just happened to search the web for Fred and saw his obituary. I worked with Fred when I graduated from UH for just over a year. He was a standup guy who treated me very well. I remember a particular Ash Wednesday. Being non-Catholic, I came into the office that day and walked into Fred's office. He had the mark of the cross on his forehead. I said, "Fred, you have a mess on your forehead". He laughed and gave me a lesson on Ash Wednesday. We laughed about that for a long time. Looking at all the family pictures, I would say he lived a very nice life. My sincere condolences to any his family that reads this. 

If Dad was still alive, he would have been age 90 tomorrow.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Friday, February 1, 2019

Friday's Faces From the Past: Fred and Lucky in the Snow, Chicago, Illinois, December 1951

Fred Pape with Lucky, Chicago, Illinois, December 1951

Been thinking about my dad, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), a lot lately, because Monday would have been his 90th birthday.  This particular photo was taken in December 1951 when he was home on leave for Christmas.  He is posing with the Pape family dog Lucky outside of the home where he grew up, 2093 West Lunt Avenue in the Rogers Park / West Ridge neighborhood of Chicago.

The picture is also fitting because of the extremely cold weather Chicago has experienced this past week.  Between December 14 and December 25 in 1951, 33.3 inches of snow fell on Chicago.  The snowpack was 17 inches deep on Christmas morning.

Dad said getting home for Christmas was a problem.  He said Colonel Lee, who commanded the 3605th Navigation Training Wing at Ellington Air Force Base in Houston, where Dad was getting his navigator training, released some planes, and two were going to the Chicago area. Dad managed to get into O'Hare (this was back when it was being used by the Air Force and wasn't the commercial airport it is today) when all other Chicago area airports were closed.


© Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Those Places Thursday: 2209 SE Bybee Blvd., Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design?

Here is another house that *may* have been designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1931.  This one is located at 2902 SE Bybee Boulevard, but unfortunately I don't have many photographs of it (click on each image to view it larger):

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, photo 1



What I *think* is the first reference to this house is on page 22 of the May 24, 1931, Oregonian, in an article entitled "House Building Gains."  

Residential construction is picking up with the advance of the spring and summer season, according to E. T. Pape, designer, who says he is finishing plans on almost $80,000 worth of house construction that is to be under way at once....
...A one-story house for M. D. Hawes at East Twenty-second street and Bybee avenue, in Westmoreland, will cost about $6,500.  It will contain six rooms and will be English in exterior design.

I'm not sure what was meant in that era by "six rooms."  Below is a main floor plan of this house dated March 2014, of the layout before a planned renovation later that year.  I count seven rooms, not including the foyer.  Was the bath or another room not normally counted?  It's entirely possible this floor was remodeled sometime between 1931 and 2014.  Perhaps the second bedroom was part of the master, or the nook was part of the kitchen.


2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, Main Floor Plan


Here is the March 2014 before-renovation plan for the upper level.  I don't know if the bedroom up there was original to the 1931 plans, or if the room was added later.

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, Second Floor Plan


What makes this a bit confusing is that the house next door, at 6916 SE 22nd Avenue, was built the same year, and perhaps about the same time.  Unfortunately, there are no historic plumbing permits for either house available at the PortlandMaps.com website, so it's not clear which house was built first.

A real estate ad in the September 8, 1943 Oregonian described the 6916 SE  22nd house as

Modern 3 bedroom, English-type, Hardwood floors, tile bath and kitchen, sunken living rm., oil heat, Patio, inclosed [sic] yard.  Across street from park and Eastmoreland golf course.

An ad for 2209 SE Bybee in the December 21, 1941 Oregonian described that house as

6 rms., genuine gumwood, 3 bedrms., large closets, beautiful time bath and kitchen, large living rm., leaded art glass studio window, all hardwood, fireplace, efficient heating plant, landscaped grounds.

A key difference appears to be the sunken living room.  Based on interior photos from recent real estate ads, the Bybee house definitely does not have that.

A May 10, 1931 Oregonian ad (two weeks before the article discussing Ewald's design for M. [Mark] D. Hawes at this intersection) is for a house, also owned by Hawes, at this intersection that is described as having a "shake, stucco, and brick exterior."  There is NO brick on the exterior of the 2209 SE Bybee house, but there is some on the 6916 SE 22nd house.  However, this ad does not mention the sunken living room, and while it describes the house as being five rooms, another ad (on August 23, 1931) for a house on the "corner lot" once again mentions shakes and brick (but not stucco), and describes the house as having seven rooms.

Ads on January 30 and February 1, 1932, specifically mention the 6916 SE 22nd house (with its old number of 1356) and its rake shakes, brick front, six rooms...and sunken living room.

The Portland city directories for 1932 and 1933 have street guides (criss-cross directories) in them, and those provide another clue.  In 1932, the 6916 house is listed as vacant - but the Bybee house is not listed at all.  In the 1933 directory, both houses exist and are occupied.

I think the house now at 6916 SE 22nd was there first.  I think Mark D. Hawes was the original owner/builder for both houses.   I think he purchased Lots 1 and 2 of Block 37 of the Westmoreland subdivision, as indicated in the highlighted portion of this October 1923 survey of the plat:

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, October 1923 plat survey


As highlighted on the 1939 sewer assets map #3732 below, these two tracts, as well as the section of undeveloped North Bybee Place just north of it, were apparently viewed as one lot.

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, 1939 sewer assets map #3732


In February 1950, a survey (#2156, below) was done in preparation for formally vacating SE Evergreen Street (formerly North Bybee Place) so that a house could be built on it (which was completed in 1951).  I highlighted Lots 1 and 2 of Block 37 below.


2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, February 1950 survey #2156


In February 1958, another survey (#27464) was done, this time to redraw the lot lines within Lots 1 and 2 of Block 37 to match reality.  So 2209 SE Bybee sits on the south half of Lots 1 and 2 of Block 37, and 6916 SE 22nd sits on the north half.

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, February 1958 survey #27646


So, what does all this mean?  It means I'm not 100% sure, but I feel pretty confident that Ewald T. Pape designed the house at 2209 SE Bybee Boulevard in Portland, Oregon.

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, photo 2


Just from these exterior views, it looks like Ewald's style.

2209 SE Bybee, Portland, Oregon, photo 3


 © Amanda Pape - 2019 - e-mail me!

Monday, January 28, 2019

Military Monday: Kodachrome In Korea V

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a paper bag containing a number of Kodachrome slides from the early and mid-1950s, taken during his time in Korea and also in Chicago and Evanston, Illinois. Kodachrome is extremely stable, and the color on these slides is near pristine. I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

This picture is from Dad's time in Korea, from October 1952 through March 1953.  I'm not sure if it is K-1 (Pusan West), where he was stationed through December 20, or K-9 (Pusan East) Air Base, where he was stationed the rest of the time (being at K-1 while a runway was rebuilt at K-9).



The building behind him (seen better in the enlargement below) seems to be under construction, so I'm guessing this is K-9.  I wish Dad was still around, so I could just ask him.  In one more week, he would have been celebrating his 90th birthday.



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Those Places Thursday: Del Mar Apartments, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

Nearly a mirror image to the San Farlando Apartments just west of it, the Del Mar Apartments, at the northeast corner of SE Hawthorne and SE 30th Avenue in Portlan, Oregon, were also constructed by Robert S. McFarland.  It appears that McFarland took the San Farlando design by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), and flipped it on the vertical axis.  Below is a view of the 30th Avenue side of the building (click on all photos to make them larger).



And below is the sign identifying the building as the "Del-Mar Apts." on the Hawthorne side of the building's corner on 30th.









A notice in the November 30, 1930 Oregonian indicated McFarland obtained a building permit for a "dwelling" at "900 Hawthorne [the pre-renumbering address of the site] between East Twenty-ninths and East Thirtieth" for what looks like a building valued either $50,000 or $60,000. A few days later, on December 11, a plumbing permit was obtained (pictured below), indicating another 14-unit building.



Interestingly, articles in the Oregonian on November 23 and 28, 1930, show that the building was permitted under planned changes to the city of Portland's housing code.  The first article, "Change in Code Favored," subtitled "Amendment in Housing Laws to Permit Closets Under Stairways," said:

Amendment of the housing code so as to permit the use of closets under wooden stairways in some cases has been recommended to the city council by the advisory board of the housing council, which also recommended an exemption from the present provisions for R. S. McFarland, who plans to build a multiple dwelling at 900 Hawthorne avenue.
The board recommended that the code be amended so that when a stairway served but one family and when each family in the multiple dwelling has its own entrance, closets may be built under the stairs if metal lath and plaster are used.  Under these conditions, the board also recommended that an exemption be granted to Mr. McFarland.  







All five units on 30th avenue are accessed from one stairway up a short slope.  At the top of the steps, just below the soldier course of bricks at the bottom of the building, are signs pointing which way to go for each unit.



Here are the entrances to units 1435 (far left), 1433 (next to it), and 1431 (near the center of the photo).  You can also see one of the corbelled brick diamond spandrel motifs in the brickwork above the Chicago School living room window - tripartite windows where the central window is a fixed pane of leaded glass (in this case, with false muntins on that pane), flanked by sash windows (in this case, four-over-one double-hung).




And here are the entrances to 1427 and 1425, which, like all the entrances on the 30th Avenue side, have pent roof tile hoods supported by decorative wrought iron brackets:



Photos of interiors can be found by clicking on these links: 142514271433, and 1435 SE 30th; 293329352949, and 2953 SE Hawthorne.  Each unit is a little different, both in size and configurations.

An end unit, 2931 SE Hawthorne, is almost 1300 square feet; it has a small addition that was apparently added in 1956 to put a half bath on the main floor, according to this plumbing permit dated March 2 of that year:



Here is the addition, the other side of which is just visible from Hawthorne through the space between the San Farlando and Del Mar buildings:




The "H. Angell" who did this was Homer Daniel Angell (1875-1968), a state representative (1929-1937), state senator (1937-1938), and United States Congressman (1939-1955).  He owned the building in 1940, according to a November 24 article in the Oregonian about improvements he was making there.  He was probably the "unnamed Portland investor" who bought the building in March 1932 for $70,000, based on an Oregonian interview in 1964 where he stated he had owned the building "for some 30 years."  On the 1940 census, Margaret Ray Calderwood Claggett (1899-1980), Angell's Portland office secretary since 1930, was living there (at address 2937 SE Hawthorne) with her first husband Forrest.  She became the second Mrs. Angell in January 1952 after the deaths of both of their spouses, and by March 1956 they moved into 2931 SE Hawthorne.  According to an obituary, Angell was a past president of the Oregon Apartment House Association, and a member of its board of managers.

Behind the building is a set of eight single garages, part of eight of the units.  A similar building for the San Farlando apartments was torn down some time ago.



© Amanda Pape - 2019 - click here to e-mail me.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Military Monday: Kodachrome in Korea IV

Last year, while cleaning out the study of my late father, Frederick Henry Pape (1929-2017), I found a paper bag containing a number of Kodachrome slides from the early and mid-1950s, taken during his time in Korea and also in Chicago and Evanston, Illinois. Kodachrome is extremely stable, and the color on these slides is near pristine. I'll be sharing more of the images in the future.

The two photos below show Dad at what I believe were anti-aircraft gun emplacements in the hills above the K-9 (Pusan East) Air Base in Korea, where he was stationed from October 1952 through March 1953.  You can see the Suyeong River in the background in the upper right, with the buildings and tents of the base next to it, and beyond that, the runway lined with aircraft.  

Unfortunately, I don't know who any of the other men in the pictures with Dad are.  I wish I could ask Dad.  Had he lived, in two more weeks, he would have been 90 years old.




Here's another view looking north from this hill, a little closer to the river.

© Amanda Pape - 2019 - click here to e-mail me.