Sunday, December 30, 2018

Sentimental (Church Record) Sunday: St. Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - Miscellaneous Exterior

While visiting my son in Chicago in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, the interior in general, the main altar (the High Altar of Angels), and the four other altars in or next to the sanctuary of the church.  I also wrote about the stained glass windows on the west side as well as those on the east side and in the narthex/vestibule area.  Lasr week I wrote about miscellaneous interior features.  Today's post is the final one on this church, about miscellaneous outdoor features.  Click on all photos to make them larger.



Just outside the front entrance is the third major statue of the church's namesake, St. Michael the Archangel (the other two statues are over the entrance door, and at the top of the main altar).  His foot rests on a defeated Lucifer.



The inscription on the base reads:  "St. Michael + Archangel assist us in our battles against the evils of the day. Our dead are not unknown soldiers. We know who they are and wither they seek to go.  Dedicated to the glory of God by St. Michael Post No. 201 Catholic War Veterans U.S.A. June 14, 1959"




Above and below:  More views of the statue of St. Michael outside the entrance.



The former church meeting hall, just east of the church entrance and constructed in 1899, was converted to six residential units in 1987.



Across from the church entrance is the current parish hall, which is the former convent, built in 1892.  It has some beautiful features like stone carvings...



...and leaded glass windows.



Finally, having nothing to do with the church but posted simply because it is located right outside the entrance and I thought it was pretty, particularly at sunset - "Genesis," a stainless steel sculpture by Jaci Willis, part of the Chicago Sculpture Exhibit.



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, December 27, 2018

Those Places Thursday: 2866 NW Ariel Terrace - An Ewald Pape Design

Here is another Tudor-style house designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1930.  This one is located at 2866 NW Ariel Terrace (next door to another of his works), but unfortunately I don't have many photographs of it (click on each image to view it larger):



This photo, from the Portland Historic Resource Inventory (available in the Oregon Historic Sites Database), is from about May 1981.  The inventory notes that the house has the following special features and materials:  "Multi-gabled roof.  Weatherboard siding on upper level.  Projecting second story hipped pavilion with half-timbering over recessed entry with tudor arch.  Brick at lower level."




A May 1961 real estate ad in the Oregonian (when the house was listed for $34,500) described it as having a central entrance hall "with all rooms very spacious" including a living room, full dining room, kitchen, breakfast room, study, and powder room on the first floor, with four bedrooms, two complete bathrooms, and a dressing room on the upper floor.  The basement had a party room.  Looking at the pictures above and below, there is apparently a deck above the basement-level garage.



Page 13 of the August 15, 1930, Oregonian lists a building permit issued to Leo J. Hanley for a $12,000 residence to be built by C. R. Sumner.  The plumbing permit, pictured below, was issued about a month later.



Although it's called the Leo J. Hanley House in the database, it doesn't look like prominent Portland attorney Leo James Hanley (1895-1958) ever lived there.  The house isn't even listed in the 1931 criss-cross directory.  It is in 1932, but Hanley's law partner, Prescott Whitehouse Cookingham, (1889-1976), lives in the house.  Cookingham, his wife Mabel, and daughters Diana and Cynthia are still at this address in the 1938 Portland city directory, but by 1940, they have moved a few blocks away.  In 1940, real estate salesman Philip Emerson Owens (1901-1962), first wife Martha White Lutz, and children Caroline and Keith are living in the house.  They are still there in the 1943 directory, but are gone by 1950.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Merry Christmas, 1968



Christmas morning, 1968, at 8015 Sharpview, Houston, Texas.  I'm on the far right, with my sister Karen next to me, back to camera.  On the other side of the photo, you can barely see our youngest sister, Mary.





© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Sentimental (Church Record) Sunday: St. Michael, Old Town, Chicago - Interior: Miscellaneous

While visiting my son in Chicago in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, the interior in general, the main altar (the High Altar of Angels), and the four other altars in or next to the sanctuary of the church.  I also wrote about the stained glass windows on the west side as well as those on the east side and in the narthex/vestibule area.  This week I'm writing about miscellaneous interior features.  Click on all photos to make them larger.

Starting near the entrance to the church - there is a mosaic of St. Michael the Archangel on the floor.




Also near the vestibule are these wooden old-style confession booths.  The priest would center the door at the center, and penitents would go in each side door.  The priest could slide open a panel on each side where he could hear but not see the penitent, to hear his or her confession.  There are also a number of statues of saints in this area.  To the left of the confessional is Saint Catherine of Alexandria (note the Catherine wheel at her side); to the right is Saint Rose of Lima (usually pictured with the infant Jesus Christ).




Along both the east and west walls, interspersed between the stained glass windows, are the fourteen Stations of the Cross, seven on each side.  Below are stations four (Jesus meets his blessed mother [Mary]) and five (Simon assists Jesus to carry the cross) on the west wall.



And below is station nine, from the opposite (east) wall, Jesus falls the third time.



A little further up on the west wall, below the three windows portraying the Assumption of Mary, is a small, newer altar to Our Lady of Guadalupe.  



Moving up towards the sanctuary, two of the side altars there (St. Joseph and Sacred Heart) are partially surrounded by what I believe are sections of the original communion rail of the church.




Next to the Sacred Heart altar is a statue of the Infant Jesus of Prague.




I've seen similar statues, of the child Jesus with a crown, holding a globus cruciger in the left hand, and the right hand giving a blessing, in many churches, each one with different real clothing.  Here is the same statue in August 2009, with different clothing and a different globus.

santo niño / Via Tsuji / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


Finally, the church also has a large elevated pulpit near the front.  The crossed tablets below the shell with the Roman numerals one through ten symbolize the Ten Commandments.  A semi-spiral staircase, on the right in the photo below, leads up to it.  The dove at the top of the shell represents the Holy Spirit.



Various popes or bishops (based on their mitres and croisers) are portrayed around the pulpit, but I'm not sure who each is.  




One more post about St. Michael's Catholic Church in Old Town, Chicago, next week, to end up the year!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, December 20, 2018

Those Place Thursday: The Beat Apartment House, 2904 SE Washington, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald Pape Design

National Register nomination materials for some of the apartment buildings designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, mention another of his works, and call it the "Beat Apartment House."  This building, really a six-plex of townhouse units, is located on a 100-foot by 50-foot lot at the intersection of SE Washington and SE 29th Avenue, near the Laurelhurst neighborhood.  Each unit has its own address.



This house is in the Oregon Historic Sites Database and the Portland Historic Resource Inventory, and is described as English Cottage style.  The Portland inventory says its special features and materials include an "exterior of brick and smooth stucco, hip roof with projecting gables, [and] round-arch porch entries" (for units 2908 and 2912).  Here is a photo of the building's Washington Street side from about May 1980, the date of the Portland inventory, that shows some of these features.




Here is how that side looked in June 2018, from a slightly different angle:




I thought the brick work of this building was especially beautiful.  Here is a view of the one unit that faces 29th Avenue, with the address 606.  You can also see the back side of the building, along with some of the back doors each unit has.



Here is the original plumbing permit for the building, showing that construction began on December 4, 1929.  The owner's name has a typo; it should read R.[obert] B. Beat (1973-1930), a respected building contractor at the time.



Interior photos of 2904 and 2908 are available from two recent real estate listings, and appear to reflect two different floor plans.  Ads indicate the 1000-square-foot units have a "living room, dining room and kitchen on the first floor, two bedrooms and bath on the second. Its public spaces are finished with mahogany woodwork, leaded and double-hung wood sash windows, vintage light fixtures and oak flooring throughout. The bathroom retains its original tile work and the kitchen has just been restored. The laundry room and a secure storage space are in the basement."


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Sentimental (Church Record) Sunday: St Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - Stained Glass, East Side and Vestibule

While visiting my son in Chicago, Illinois, in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, the interior in general, and the main altar (the High Altar of Angels), and the four other altars in or next to the sanctuary of the church.  Last week I wrote about the stained glass windows on the west side of the church; this week I'll write about those on the east side and in the narthex/vestibule area.  Click on all photos to make them larger.

The stained glass windows in the nave (the main part) of the church, five windows on each side, were added (along with the five altars) in 1902 for the parish's 50th anniversary.  Franz Mayer & Company from Munich, Germany, designed and produced the windows.   They used precious metals to enhance the rich colors: gold dust for red; cobalt for blue; uranium for green.  The figures in the scenes are dressed in Renaissance-style clothing.

The windows on the east side of the nave depict scenes from the life of Jesus Christ, and are called the Holy Redeemer Windows.  The three windows grouped together in the center portray the Ascension of Jesus into heaven.  Jesus is surrounded by seven angels (the one to the left picture here; the five above him pictured here; the one to the right pictured here) as the apostles and his mother Mary watch.



Here is more detail of Jesus.  You can see the marks of the nails from the Crucifixion on his hands and foot.



At the bottom of the center panel are representations of two of the Four Evangelists, Saint Matthew (his symbol is a winged man), and Saint Mark (who is represented by a winged lion).



Starting at the entrance to the church, the closest window is one depicting the finding of Jesus in the temple as a child.  His mother Mary and stepfather Joseph are at the top of the stairs.


Moving towards the sanctuary, the next window depicts Jesus blessing the children.  A group of angels (better viewed here) is in the tree near the top of the window.



Here is a closer view of Jesus blessing the children.  Saints Peter and John confer just behind him.



The parish calls the next window the "Dinner Window."  It depicts the scene in Luke 7:36-50, when Jesus has dinner in the home of a Pharisee, and a sinful woman washes and anoints his feet.



Finally, the last Holy Redeemer window on the east side depicts Jesus revealing his Sacred Heart to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, in the 1600s in a small town in France.  This window is situated right next to the Sacred Heart altar in the sanctuary.  Margaret Mary’s modesty and humility are symbolized by the brocade horizontal curtain (to the left in the background) and the white lilies (to the right in the foreground) respectively.  The two angels towards the upper left are better viewed here.



In 1924, the parish began raising funds to replace its organ and remodel the choir loft, which now features a window highlighting Saint Cecilia (the patron saint of music), also by Franz Mayer amd Company of Munich.



There are also other music and floral theme windows in the choir loft area, such as this one.



Single standing painted-on-glass saints are above the three inner doorways of the church. The doorway above the central aisle has the following eight saints, from left to right:  Elizabeth of Hungary, Louis [IX King] of France, Agnes, Alphonsus, Boniface, Philomena, Henry, and Kunigundis.



One of the side aisles has these six saints above the doorway, from left to right:  Wendelin, Rose of Lima, Nicholas, Matilda, Barbara, and Lawrence.



Finally, the last side aisle has these six saints above the doorway, from left to right:  Pancratius, Nothberga, [Pope] Clement [I], Helena, Margaret, and Bernard.


Single and paired standing saints fill the apse windows (of which, unfortunately, I have no images, probably because the windows appear to have been deliberately darkened, perhaps to protect the High Altar of Angels from excessive light).

Next week, I will write about miscellaneous interior items in St. Michael.

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Four-Plex at 2703 NW Raleigh, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald T. Pape Design

Another bungalow four-plex designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1928, is this one, at the corner of NW Raleigh Street and NW 27th Avenue.



An August 19, 1928 article in the Portland Oregonian called "Apartment to be Built" said, "C. Jenkins is planning to erect a 1 and 1/2-story apartment house at 341 Twenty-seventh street North at an estimated cost of $14,000.  R. S. McFarland has been awarded the general contract.  Plans were drawn by E. T. Pape."  Here is the plumbing permit, dated August 24, 1928:




The "official" address later became 2703 NW Raleigh, although only one of the four units, pictured below, actually opens onto Raleigh.



This building is listed in the Portland Historic Resource Inventory and the Oregon Historic Sites Database.  Ewald designed the building with elements of the Tudor English Cottage style.  "Although a more vernacular adaptation of the style, the apartment displays characteristics of the style in its steeply-pitched cross-gable roof, stucco gable ends, asymmetrical massing, [double-hung wood sash] multi-pane windows, shallow boxed eaves, and brick construction."  The one-and-one-half storied structure also features two interior brick chimneys, trim board, panel entry doors, concrete steps with wrought-iron railings, one shingled dormer [on the north end], and sills with rowlock course.


Above and below - views along the NW 27th Avenue side of the building.



Above and below:  Entries for the units with the 1609, 1611, and 1613 NW 27th Avenue addresses.   


As for the interiors, according to recent ads, two of the units (2703 and 1613) have two bedrooms upstairs with high ceilings and are 1100 square feet; the other two units (1609 and 1611) have one bedroom and one bath.  All units have hardwood floors; dining areas with built-ins; kitchens including dishwashers; a "character-rich bath with tub, pedestal sink, and period honeycomb tile;" a spacious basement with washer, dryer, and tons of extra storage space; both a front and back door; and forced air gas heat.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.