Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Happy Birthday to My Baby Sister!


Mary on Halloween 1966.  She's got a red sucker in her mouth, that's why it looks like she has red lipstick on.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Sentimental Church (Record) Sunday: St. Vincent de Paul, Chicago: Interior, Decorative Painting

Six weeks ago I wrote about the exterior of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Chicago, where my Massmann great-grandparents, Frederick Henry Massmann, 1875-1948, and Elizabeth Regina Dienes Massmann, 1876-1946, were married on June 5, 1900Five weeks ago I started writing about the interior, specifically, the stained glass windows; continuing the next two weeks.  Two weeks ago I wrote about the main altar, and last week I wrote about the side altars and other statues in the church.

This week I am writing about the decorative painting in the church.  According to pages 22-23 of Heavenly City: The Architectural Tradition of Catholic Chicago, by Denis Robert McNamara, "An extensive decorative painting program executed by the prolific ecclesiastical painter John A. Mallin [this Czech immigrant also decorated St. Jerome in Rogers Park] once filled the entire interior with patterns and images, the vestiges of which still grace the sanctuary apse ceiling [pictured below]."  It's not stated why the rest of the paintings are gone, but the same 1955 fire in the south end of the church that resulted in a new choir loft stained glass window likely destroyed them.  An image of how the church looked before the fire is available on a website about John Mallin.


Above and (detail) below:  Decorative painting in sanctuary ceiling of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, Chicago.  Click on the images to make them larger.



According to that website, Mallin was hired to do these paintings in 1946, and was paid $20,000 for the work.  He is also responsible for four murals at the front of the church, two each over the two side altars.  I was able to use some clues in the murals to figure out what they depict.  Click on each image to make it larger.

Starting from the left as you look toward the altars, this first one is on the west wall above the left side altar to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God.  Jesus Christ is holding out the Red Scapular of the Passion to a nun who has a distinctive hat.  That hat, a cornette, is a mark of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, an order founded by this church's namesake and St. Louise de Marillac.  The nun pictured though is Sister Louise-Apolline-Aline Andriveau, 1810-1895, of France.



The next mural is immediately to the right of the Red Scapular mural, right above the Mary side altar, and faces south.  The clue in this photo were the words around the image of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  I could make out the words on her right side, which say, "have recourse to thee."  Those are the last few words on the Miraculous Medal, the design of which is based on the 1830 apparitions in France of Mary to St. Catherine Labouré (1806-1876), who was also a Daughter of Charity.  The entire sentence on the medal and around the image of Mary pictured below is "O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee."  I am guessing that St. Catherine is the nun pictured.



Above the St. Joseph side altar, which is to the right of the main altar as you look at it, is this mural of "The Death of St. Joseph."  His foster son, Jesus Christ, is on one side of the dying saint, and the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, his wife, is on the other side. 



Finally, just to the right of the previous mural, on the east wall, is this mural of Jesus Christ appearing to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690), the French nun who promoted devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus.



Next Sunday, I will write about some of the other decorative and functional elements in the interior of this church.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Willister Court Apartments, Portland, Oregon, An Ewald Pape Design

Another of the earlier designs of my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), is this apartment building at the corner of SE Madison and SE 29th, which at one time was known as the Willister Court Apartments.  Here's a photo I took of it from the Madison side in June 2018:




The "Middle Class Apartments in East Portland" Multiple Property Listing on file with the National Park Service has this to say about the Willister Court Apartments (section F, page 3):

"In 1928 [sic, should be 1926], Ewald Pape designed two quarter block apartment buildings, both one-story English Cottage style, for a parcel owned by Robert McFarland, the north half of the lot bounded by Madison, Hawthorne, 29th and 30th....the Willister Courts were at the west end at 2910 SE Madison Street [at the intersection with SE 29th]. For these parcels, Pape used an "L" shape and placed his units as close to the street as possible. The result was an interior courtyard for garages and greenspace away from the noise, dust and intrusion of the streets."

Here's the November 5, 1926 plumbing permit:



Here's the footprint of the building, from the PortlandMaps.com website.



Each unit has a separate address, with a front door and a back door.  Starting at the upper right corner of the map above, the units wrap around to the left (west) along Madison and then down (south) along 29th.  Here is 2924 SE Madison.  This corner unit has its main entrance to the right, behind the hedge, and the back door is on the left side of the building, somewhat visible.



And here - on the patio, on the left side, are the entrances to 2922 SE Madison (on the left) and 2920 SE Madison (with the flower on the door).



On the other half of this patio, you can see the front and back doors for 2918 SE Madison:



Next, steps from either side take you up to a landing with the entrances to 2912 and 2910 SE Madison:




On the corner of Madison and 29th is a very small unit with the address 1404 SE 29th.  Its front door is immediately to the right of the house number, on that stair landing, while its back door is also visible in this photo.  I'll write more about this unit in a bit (since I got to go inside it), but the windows immediately to the left of the house number are those of the living room, while the windows near the back door are for the bedroom



Continuing south along 29th, four units open onto a long narrow landing.  Here are 1410, 1412, and 1414 SE 29th:



And here are 1412 and 1414 (again) and 1418 SE 29th:



This is the other side of 1418 SE 29th.  There's a small sign hanging from the corner, pointing back to 1422 SE 29th, Units 1-4.  You can see another building in the background, to the right.  That building is NOT Ewald's design, which was only for the original 11 units in the complex.  It's a later addition, adding four units in a two-story building where I believe the garage advertised for the rest of the units used to be (back when cars were smaller and 11 cars might have actually fit on its location).




Below are some rough-drawn plans of the complex from PortlandMaps.com for a May 2017 permit to do some alterations.  It shows the access points to the basement storage areas and laundry room, as well as the main entry and back doors for all the units (except the back door for 1410).



While I was going around taking photos of the building, a lady residing in 1404 called out to me from her living room window and asked what I was doing.  When I explained that my architect relative had designed the building and I was documenting his work, she asked if I would like to see the inside of her apartment!












At left is the address sign and the mail slot for her unit.  I did not feel comfortable taking pictures of the interior, but I saw little things that let me know it was Ewald's design, such as small built-in shelving areas in the kitchen.

The apartment was quite small, but had an interesting flow.  I sketched a rough floor plan out, which is above right.  One enters the living room of the apartment, which flows to a small eating area and kitchen.  One must go through the bathroom to get to the bedroom, which is also where the back door for the apartment is.  The bedroom is quite small and only suitable for a twin or full-size bed.  The apartment is well lit, with windows on the west and north sides in the living area and a window (pictured below) in the kitchen area, as well as a window in the bedroom.



According to various articles in the Oregonian, the building sold in April 1931 for $45,000; in January 1935; in May 1936 (when the buyer named it Willister Court); in August 1938 (for $45,000 plus a trade for some suburban acreage); and in October 1952 (for $58,000); with a sale somewhere between those last two, probably in 1945.  An April 13, 1941 Oregonian article indicated the apartments were being "reconditioned," redecorated and with "installation of new ranges."  However, the exterior of the building, except for differences in paint, looks identical to photos that accompanied the May 24, 1936 and August 14, 1938 Oregonian articles about its sales.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Sentimental Church (Record) Sunday: St. Vincent de Paul, Chicago: Interior, Side Altars and Statues

Five weeks ago I wrote about the exterior of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Chicago, where my Massmann great-grandparents, Frederick Henry Massmann, 1875-1948, and Elizabeth Regina Dienes Massmann, 1876-1946, were married on June 5, 1900Four weeks ago I started writing about the interior, specifically, the stained glass windows; continuing the next two weeks, and last week I wrote about the main altar.  This week I am writing about the side altars and other statues in the church.

The altar just below is to the immediate left of the main altar, as you look at them.  It honors the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God.  I will write more about the painting above it (and the next altar) next week.




The altar immediately to the right of the main altar, while looking at both, honors St. Joseph, the adoptive father of Jesus.



To the right of St. Joseph is the altar pictured below, which depictsJesus in the Garden of Gethsemane, illustrating this passage from the Gospel of Luke, chapter 22:

39Jesus left the city and went, as he usually did, to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples went with him. 40When he arrived at the place, he said to them, “Pray that you will not fall into temptation.” 41Then he went off from them about the distance of a stone's throw and knelt down and prayed. 42“Father,” he said, “if you will, take this cup of suffering away from me. Not my will, however, but your will be done.” 43An angel from heaven appeared to him and strengthened him.



Here is more detail of the carving under this altar, of Jesus falling while carrying the cross:



The other altar, to the left of the Mary altar, is the one pictured below, which I believe honors St. Vincent de Paul, the namesake of the church.  This saint appears to be in a priest's robes and has a cross, a palm frond, a broken chain with a manacle at the end, and something else (a large unlit candle perhaps), and that symbolism doesn't fit any saint I can find.  St. Vincent would be logical for this church, though.



On the west side of the church, to the left of the altar above and closest to it, is a statue of a Pietà.



And in the next alcove on the west side, on the south side of the door, is Jesus with the Sacred Heart.



Continuing south along the west side of the church, the next shrine is to St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (on the left), the first native-born citizen of the United States to be canonized, and on the right is another representation of St. Vincent de Paul.



Directly across the center aisle, on the east side of the church, is another shrine, with statues of St. Thérèse of Lisieux and of St. Anthony of Padua, with a painting of Our Lady of Guadalupe between them.  



Finally, to the left of this shrine, also on the east wall, is a statue of the Infant Jesus of Prague.  I've seen this statue, of the child Jesus with a crown, holding a globus cruciger in the left hand, and the right hand giving a blessing, in many churches, each one with different real clothing.



Next Sunday:  more of the interior of the church.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Those Places Thursday: What Happened to One of Ewald's Houses - Revisited

I recently discovered that the PortlandMaps.com website, where the City of Portland, Oregon posts information about properties in the city - including historic plumbing permits dating back to the home's construction - also includes plans and other documents when a permit was obtained for any additions or remodeling.

I decided to go back and see if any of the buildings designed by my architect first-cousin-twice removed Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976) had any such plans from earlier remodels.  I was particularly excited to see that a house I wrote about back in July 2018 - one of the few of his works that actually no longer exists - had such plans.

The house at  6438 SW Burlingame Place, that infamously slid down its hillside ten years ago, in October 2008, had been remodeled in 2004.  The plans for that remodel were available at PortlandMaps, and included rough floor plans for the existing conditions.  I cleaned those up a bit, adding labels to the rooms, and here they are, starting with the main floor (ground floor at street level) - click on them to make them larger:




Here is the upper level (bedrooms and bathrooms):




And here is the lower level (family room, another bedroom and bath, storage, laundry, and one room whose use was unclear):



Finally, here is the basement, which is storage and mechanical:




Most of the 2004 work affected the interior - changing the smallest upstairs bedroom into a large master closet and an enlarged (non-master) bathroom, and reorienting rooms on the lower level to create an office where the bedroom used to be (moving said bedroom into part of the family room area, and the displaced family room space into that previously-unidentified space), adding a snack bar, and making the bathroom bigger.

The main change on the main floor involved "filling in" the alcove area between the garage (on the left in the plan below) and the bay-window-like area where the half-bath was. This fill-in became the new half-bath, and the other space was reconfigured to improve traffic flow.  The kitchen was extensively redone, removing the odd protruding peninsula (for lack of a better time) that I suspect was likely an even earlier remodel, well prior to 2000 (the earliest date I have found on any plans on the PortlandMaps site so far).




The next two photos show how the house looked in August 2007 and are a historical view from Google Maps Street View.  Honestly, it's not really clear to me why Ewald had that alcove in the first place.  Perhaps in 1929, when this home was designed, it was not common for the garage to have a door opening directly into the house.



I also learned a little about one of the earliest owners of the house.  He was Dr. Robert Budd Karkeet, 1884-1960, who apparently specialized in ear, nose, and throat bronchoscopy, and, earlier, was an oculist.  The doctor, his wife Cora Alma Hardinghaus Karkeet (1884–1973), and their daughter Evelyn Elizabeth "Betty" Karkeet (Mrs. John) Gould (born about 1913), may have moved into the house as early as  late 1930 (when it was built, but after the April 1930 Census).  They were definitely there by the time the 1932 city directory) was published, and until at least 1943 (per city directory) and possibly as late as 1946 (when an ad for the sale of the house appears in the Oregonian).



That October 13, 1946 ad describes the house as:

Located on that high, most northerly promitory of North Burlingame, its view is superb.  Every room including the 4 bedrooms enjoy this breath-taking panorama.  There are 3 full baths and a lavatory [half-bath]. Large party room with oak floor.  Costly hot-water heating plant and double attached garage.

This description matches the pre-2004 floor plan, so it's very possible that the ones shown in this post are very similar to - if not THE actual - plans Ewald drew.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Sentimental Church (Record) Sunday: St. Vincent de Paul, Chicago: Interior, Main Altar

Four weeks ago I wrote about the exterior of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Chicago, where my Massmann great-grandparents, Frederick Henry Massmann, 1875-1948, and Elizabeth Regina Dienes Massmann, 1876-1946, were married on June 5, 1900Three weeks ago I started writing about the interior, specifically, the stained glass windows; continuing the next week and last week.

This week I am writing about the main, or high, altar of the church.  Here's a view in its entirety (click on all photos to make them larger):



This gorgeous marble altar was designed by Augustine O'Callahan and was installed in 1909 (so, not there when my great-grandparents married).  It is made with eight different types of marble. 

The tabernacle, pictured below, is free-standing (i.e., not part of the reredos or altar panels behind it.



Above:  The upper part of the taberbacle,with the reredo behind it.
Below:  One of the angels guarding the tabernacle.





Left panel (above) and right panel (below) of the reredo behind the main altar.




Above and below:  The Last Supper pictured in the center panel of the reredo behind the altar, directly above and behind the tabernacle.


Even the lower part of the main altar is quite intricate - note the Lamb of God in the center below:



Above and below:  Tile mosaics in the lower part with (mostly) concealed lighting.




Above and below:  Angels to the left and right of the main (high) altar.




Below:  carving at the base of the one of the large angel statues, that includes acanthus leaves and passion flowers, as well as the letters IHS, which are a Christogram, a monogram symbolizing Jesus Christ.   According to Heavenly City: The Architectural Tradition of Catholic Chicago, by Denis Robert McNamara, much of the foliage carvings were done by Carl Beil, who also sculpted for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.



Here is one last look at the whole altar.  Next week, I will write about some of the smaller altars around the church.



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.