Sunday, August 19, 2018

Sentimental Sunday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design: Details

As mentioned in a previous post, a few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She lives at the Rosegate Condominiums in Portland, Oregon, formerly the Beacon Hill Apartments, which were designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

Not only did Gina send me some photos of the inner courtyard, she also sent some interior shots of her condo.  This post, I'm featuring some of the details in her unit.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.


Above:  Dining room chandelier.  Below:  Living room light fixture.
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




Above:  Close-up of dining room hutch.  Below:  Door hardware.
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Another resident named Nancy e-mailed me about the Rosegate in 2015.  She told me they were converted from apartments to condominiums in 1999, and that she was one of the original purchasers of a condo.  She said,

"At the time his apartment was converted to condos the Oregonian covered the project as it was the first vintage apartment to have a conversion. The developer retained all of the charm of the original features like door knockers, downstairs electric chandeliers while upgrading them to code.

Within 5 years many apartments across Portland followed suit."

She later wrote,

"Each unit has a quirk making it completely unique from each other apartment townhouse."

Gina sent me the following picture of a page from the 1999 sales brochure, showing the floor plan for unit 1, a three-bedroom:



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Inside the Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Hill Apartments, An Ewald Pape Design

As mentioned in my previous post, a few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She lives at the Rosegate Condominiums in Portland, Oregon, formerly the Beacon Hill Apartments, which were designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

Not only did Gina send me some photos of the inner courtyard, she also sent some interior shots of her condo.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.


Above and below:  "Living room facing Halsey."  
Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Above and below:  "Rosegate dining room -  
I love the arched entry wall, original leaded glass hutch, and chandelier."  Photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Below:  "Cute little kitchen - Original cabinets but reproduction floor and counter tile."  Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



Below:  "Bedroom" Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.  Gina lives in the only one bedroom, single-story unit in the complex, which she theorizes was probably originally the office and apartment of the manager when the complex was the Beacon Arms Apartments.



An ad for an open house for the new apartments in the July 26, 1931 Oregonian gives the following description:
Spacious living rooms, 14x22; wrought iron stair rails, curtain and drape rods, guest closet, corner cupboard in dining room.
Large bedrooms, well arranged; ample closet space, through ventilation.  Baths with pattern tile.
Complete kitchens designed by women.  Westinghouse chrome top stoves, individual General Electric refrigerators, exhaust fans.
Steam heat, recessed radiation, and hot water furnished.
Lockers, washing machines, clotheslines and showers in basement.

More photos of some of the interior details on Sunday!

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Sentimental Sunday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design: Courtyard

A few weeks ago, I received an e-mail from Gina Romaine with the subject line, "E. T. Pape designed my home!"  She wrote:

I live in a beautiful building that was designed by E.T. Pape.  It's the Rosegate Condominiums at 4353 NE Halsey.  I have lived here for 15 years, but have loved the building since I first discovered it back in the 1980s.  I used to live next door, and always told my sister how much I'd love to live in this building someday.  And here I am, a home owner at Rosegate.  I did some research with the Oregonian archives on line and discovered a great photograph of the building from July 26, 1931.  There's also a nice article from Feb. 15, 1931, that describes the building with the headline "Apartments to Rise, Modern Structure designed by E.T. Pape."  The building was originally called The Beacon Arms.  It was so much fun discovering more about this beautiful building's history, and I was thrilled to discover your family blog and discover even more about the wonderful man who designed our building.  His gorgeous & thoughtful architecture has inspired me to seek out his other Portland buildings and homes.  Thanks for posting so many of them on your web site.  And the Black Sheep post [about Ewald's alien case file) was heartbreaking to read.  How terribly we have treated immigrants, yesterday & today.

When Gina found out I'd only been able to take pictures from the outer (street) side of the building, she offered to send me some photos of the inner courtyard.  All photographs in this post are copyright Gina Romaine and used with her permission.

"Our beautiful fountain - The fountain is in the center of the courtyard."
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




A July 26, 1931 article in the Oregonian entitled "New Apartments Ready" had "Landscaping is Feature" in its subtitle, and a whole paragraph on the topic:

"Landscaping of the project, which is built around an open garden plot, is extensive.  Rock gardens, grass plots, shrubbery clumps and a large pool with double waterfall are included in the landscaping scheme."  It appears some of the landscaping has changed a little over the years, but that has not diminished its loveliness.


"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking Northeast"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.




Later ads (such as March 21, 1932) described the three-quarter acre as "landscaped as large estate" and (July 19. 1932) "new apt. bldg. is a home both inside and out.  Pools, shrubbery, rockeries, garages and private driveway, are some of the details..."


"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking East"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"Rosegate courtyard view - Looking Southeast"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"North Lawn - Looking South from North lawn, with fountain just past Japanese Maple"Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"South lawn - looking northeast from south lawn"
Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



The July 26, 1931 Oregonian article mentioned that the "apartment is of modern American design, and is of brick with tiled roof," but didn't mention the leaded glass windows, some of which still exist in some apartments.





Above and below:  "Leaded glass windows" - 
photos © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



"Front door door knocker - Little window opens from inside to see who’s at the door."  Photo © Gina Romaine, 2018, and used with her permission.



So what's inside the door?  Check out the next post, this coming Thursday!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Rosegate Condominiums / Beacon Arms Apartments - An Ewald Pape Design.





This lovely building is part of a fourteen-unit apartment-turned-condominium in Portland, Oregon, designed by my architect first cousin twice removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in 1931.

The first mention I could find of the structure was an article entitled "Apartments to Rise" in the Sunday, February 15, 1931, Portland Oregonian.  It lists E. T. Pape as the designer and indicates the east side structure will cost $85,000.  It will have fourteen five- and six-room suites, and was to be constructed for Albert E. Bartell "at East Forty-fifth North [now NE 45th Avenue] and [NE] Halsey streets."  Frank E. Knapp was the builder.

Here's the plumbing permit, dated March 6, 1931.  The original address was 1263 Halsey, after Portland's street renumbering/renaming in 1932-34, it became 4353 NE Halsey:



The Oregonian article goes on to describe the units as "having living rooms and kitchens on the first floor and bedrooms and baths upstairs.  Each apartment will have its individual entrance." The building itself "will be 50x180 in dimensions, two stories in height, with two wings 34x78.  Exterior will be of brick."




A July 26, 1931 Oregonian article on page 2 titled "New Apartments Ready" notes the tiled roof and that it "has the advantage of a complete home in that the individual apartments...have both front and rear entrances."  Entrances fronting on Halsey street can be seen in the photograph below.



Interestingly, there's a separate building (visible at left in the photo above with the entrance gate) that is apparently part of the condominium complex, but that wasn't described in the February 15 article.  You can see from the photo below that it is not quite as ornate:



This building has the address 4341, and I'm not completely sure if Ewald designed it or not.  Its plumbing permit is not available online, and it isn't referenced in the July 26, 1931 Oregonian article, which only mentions the fourteen units.  However, a February 17, 1931 Oregonian article on page 18 called "Projects In Portland To Involve $188,500" describes the apartment building as "U-shaped, 187 feet long and 87 feet wide on the ends.  It will have 22 apartments."  The U-shaped building is 4353 and has 14 units, 1 through 15 (13 is skipped).  This rectangular building, 4341, has six units, numbers 16 through 21.

The July 26, 1931 article has a photograph of the U-shaped building, and notes that it has no name.  However, by January 24, 1932, ads are appearing in the Oregonian calling it The Beacon Arms.  That name disappears from the Oregonian after the building was sold in July 1942.  In 1999, the buildings were converted to condominiums and named "The Rosegate."




I was recently contacted by a current resident of the complex, who offered to take some additional photographs for me (since it's a gated community).  Come back on Sunday to see her stunning photos of the Rosegate's gorgeous courtyard.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Friday's Faces From the Past: Happy Birthday to My Brother Mark!



My brother Mark on his First Communion Day, spring 1967


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Monday, July 30, 2018

Mappy Monday - Portland Oregon: The Age of A City

Another cool tool I've been using in my research on the buildings designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), is this cool one at http://labratrevenge.com/pdx/

Justin Palmer created the map using a dataset provided by the City of Portland that included information on the year most structures in the city were built.  Each color in the map indicates a different decade (while gray indicates that no year of construction was available), ranging from pre-1900 to 2010 and later.



You can zoom in on different areas on the map - here are some examples:



Above:  Zooming in on SE Madison St., between SE 20th Ave. and SE 26th Ave.
Below:  Zooming in on SE Caruthers St., between SE 20th Ave. and SE 26th Ave.  This area is due south of SE Madison St.



This map can help me in cases where I know, from an old newspaper article, the rough location of a building Ewald designed, but not the exact address or site.  For example, on the map below, centered on NE U.S. Grant Place, I know that Ewald designed four homes on this street in 1931, according to an article on page 26 of the June 7, 1931 Portland Oregonian.  The lighter-blue houses on that street are too old (built in the 1920s), while those that are purple or pink are too young.  I use it in conjunction with the City's PortlandMaps.com site, to quickly rule out properties so I only have to check the images of historic building permits there for the true possibilities, trying to match up the dates of the permits and the listed owners with the information in the newspaper article.



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Those Places Thursday: "Mediterranean Type House Designed for West Side Hills District" by Ewald Pape, 1930

This lovely house, designed by my first-cousin-twice-removed Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), is at 2880 NW Ariel Terrace in the Kings Heights neighborhood in Portland, Oregon.  This area is west of the Willamette River, and many of the homes here have great views of the river, downtown, and nearby mountains such as Mt. Hood.




This house is in the Oregon Historic Sites Database as the Alvin C. Greenwood House.  The two-story structure was built in 1930 and Greenwood was the general contractor.  A building permits list published in the July 18, 1930 Oregonian includes the house, estimated to cost $25,000.  The plumbing permits from August 28, 1930, and September 29, 1930, pictured below, indicate the house originally had seven bathrooms, three with bathtubs and one with a shower.  The address was 1126 Ariel Terrace before the 1931-1933 Portland street renumbering.






The December 28, 1930 Sunday Oregonian has a sketch of the house, no doubt done by Ewald, with the same title as this blog post.  It has the following caption:  "Stucco [walls], tile [roof], and wrought iron will be used in this fine home planned for Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Greenwood on Ariel terrace, Westover, at the end of the Westover [street]car line.  E. T. Pape is the designer."  The family was living in the home by October 19, 1931, as there was a reference to them at that address.

Subsequent newspaper articles indicate the Greenwood family lived in the house until 1972, when it first shows up in real estate ads.  Alvin Charles Greenwood was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1885, but came to Portland in 1909 with his wife, the former Lillian M. Caesar, who born in Wisconsin in 1884.  Greenwood was involved in highway construction in the Pacific Northwest.  An article in the May 2, 1933 Oregonian indicated he suffered a serious injury when a truck from his Greenwood Construction Company backed over both his legs at a worksite in Lockwood, Oregon.

Numerous newspaper notices detail Lillian's involvement with such groups as the University of Oregon Mothers Club, the Allied Arts Club, Kappa Xi, the Delphian Society, and Chi Omega Mothers Club.  She apparently was also a professional artist, winning first place in the professional division at the 1947 Multnomah County Fair for an oil painting of flowers (according to the August 20 Oregonian).

The couple had five children:  Keith Charles (1909-1937, who died in an auto accident), John Alvin (1911-1987), Kathryn M. (Mrs. Charles Curtis Smith, 1913-2000), Jane (Mrs. Joydon Claridge, 1914-2006), and Robert Lawrence (1917-1982), as well as at least 12 grandchildren and at least 21 great-grandchildren, according to their obituaries.  Alvin died May 3, 1954, and Lillian died on Christmas Day, 1971

The 1940 Census shows Alvin and Lillian living in the big house with daughter Kathryn, her husband, and their three children.

The house was not sold until 1972, after Lillian's death and 41 years of occupancy by the Greenwoods.  An August 20 real estate ad from that year notes that the house has approximately 2300 square feet of living area on each level, five spacious bedrooms, four full baths, three half baths, a 22' by 34' living room, a formal dining room, a breakfast room, a library, a studio, a recreation room, three fireplaces, and a beautiful curving staircase.  The asking price then was $85,000. 

In April 1985, the asking price was $399,000, but it sold for $310,000 that October.  It sold twice in 2006, in January for $1,510,000 and in May for $2,450,000.

Here's a photo of the house from around May 1981, which was included in the City of Portland Historic Resource Inventory:



That inventory notes some of the special features of the house, such as the leaded glass fanlight over the recessed arched entry, and the upper level balconette with a wrought-iron railing just above it, both visible in the picture below:



Other features include decorative wrought iron over a lower level front window (just behind the wall in the picture below), and Art Deco motifs, between the windows just above it.




© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Friday's Faces From the Past: 50th Wedding Anniversary in Lithuania


My third cousin Osvaldas Guokas recently shared this picture.  It was taken in
1979 in Panevėžys, Lithuania.  It is of my first-cousin-twice-removed Juozapas Guokas (born 1902) and his wife, Konstancija Tamošiūnaitė Guokienė, on their 50th wedding anniversary  They are the seated couple.  Behind Konstancija is her relative (haven't figured out yet how they are related), Ona Tamošiūnaitė Radauskienė Marcinkus (1907-1988) Behind Juozapas is Ona's daughter Bernice Ann Radauskas Dylo (1940-2004).  Bernice and Ona were visiting Lithuania at this time.  Osvaldas didn't identify the man standing in the back, but I think it is Bernice's husband Donald John Dylo (1941-1996).  Ona was between husbands.  My first-cousin-twice-removed Leonas "Leo" Radauskas (1889-1973) had died, and she married her second husband, Michael William Marcinkus (1899-1987), in 1983.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Mystery Monday: A Mis-Attribution - Ewald Pape's design at 3257 NE U. S. Grant Place, Portland, Oregon

Two articles in the June 7, 1931, Portland Oregonian mention a house that my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), designed.  One article, called "Church Gets Permit," says:

"The [city] bureau [of buildings] also issued a permit for a $12,000 residence, to be erected by J. H. Cleland at 985 U. S. Grant place. E. T. Pape prepared the plans."

The second article, called "Six Houses Under Way," said:

"For John H. Cleland, he [E. T. Pape] has designed a two-story colonial of nine rooms, also for U. S. Grant place, that will cost approximately $12,000.  It will contain three baths."

Using PastPortland.com, I determined that the address after the 1932 renumbering was 3257 NE U. S. Grant Place, and this is the house:




So in doing my research, I checked the Oregon Historic Sites Database.  The house is described in the attached City of Portland Historic Resource Inventory form as being a Twentieth Century Colonial, with "gable roof, boxed cornice with return, brick end-wall chimney, pedimented entry with modillioned cornice supported by two sets of double-columns, double doors with elliptical fan light above, round arched window with keystones, and louvered shutters."

A real estate listing from 2013 notes a "gracious formal entry with open staircase is flanked by spacious living and dining rooms with hardwood floors, [period light fixtures, original] leaded [glass] windows and built-ins [like a china hutch in the dining room]. Four large bedrooms up includes grand master suite" with three closets.   "Period baths" have "original tile."

However, I was surprised to find some discrepancies in the City of Portland's Historic Resource Inventory form.  Here's a snippet from the first page for this property:



Architectural plans by Edward J. Green?

This had to be a mistake.  Note that Cleland is also spelled wrong.  Also, on the next page of the form, the wrong address is given as the old address of the property:



I decided to double-check the City of Portland's 1933 index for house and street renumbering. Here's the relevant section from page 90:



As can be seen, the old 991 U. S. Grant Place is today's 3265 NE U. S. Grant Place, which happens to be the house next door, also owned by John Cleland.  Perhaps that is the one designed by Edward J. Green.  If you look at the plumbing permit available on PortlandMaps.com, you can see why the error might have happened:



The card shows 991 crossed out and 985 written just above it, as well as the renumbered/renamed address, 3257 NE.  Other details correspond:  Cleland as the owner, 2 story, 3 baths (water closets or toilets).  The date of the permit is July 11, 1931, just a month after the newspaper articles.  The house next door, today's 3265, was also owned by Cleland, but its plumbing permit is dated September 26, 1931.

Here's a photo of the house at 3257 NE U. S. Grant Place from sometime around May 1981, the date the ownership at that time was noted.  Since then, door and window shutters on the first floor have been removed, as have storm doors on the front:


I'll be contacting the City of Portland and sharing my research, in hopes that the incorrect information can be corrected in the Oregon Historic Sites database immediately as well as when the City of Portland Historic Resource Inventory is updated, as there are plans to do that.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Ewald Pape's First Portland Design?

A modest house at 2027 N. Skidmore Court in Portland, Oregon's older Overlook neighborhood may be one of the first, if not *the* first, house designed in Portland by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976).  It is listed in the Oregon Historic Sites Database.


Above and below:  Photos of 2027 N. Skidmore Ct., Portland, Oregon, June 13, 2018



The English Cottage style house features shingle siding, a gable roof with an assymetrical gable front entrance, and a massive chimney.  The 1,449-square-foot single-story house has three bedrooms, one and a half baths, a gas fireplace, an unfinished basement, and a detached garage (the current one is a replacement for one there prior to 2003, although it might also not be original).  

The house was originally built for Guy Edward Jaques Sr., shortly after his marriage to Evalyn L. Bailey in Portland on June 24, 1925.  Here is its August 14, 1925 plumbing permit, from the PortlandMaps.com City site:




Guy Jaques is probably the bigger reason the house is in the Historic Sites database.  Jaques was born in Dowes, Iowa, in 1896, but by 1910 his family was in Washington state.  He graduated from the University of Washington in 1924 and worked for a steamship and logging company until 1926.  From 1926 to 1934 he was employed by various savings and loan companies in Portland.  In 1934, he founded Portland Federal Savings and Loan, later called Far West Federal.  He served on the Portland School Board, 1944-1948; as a director of the Federal Home Loan Bank, from 1944; and on the Portland Planning Commission.  He also started the Fifth Avenue Investment Company.  He died in 1978.

The original address for the home was 129 Griswold Avenue.  Jaques was living here still at the 1940 Census, along with his wife and son Guy Jr.  Later Guy Sr. moved to Lake Oswego, Oregon, but Guy Jr. continued to live in the house through 1956, then he also moved to Lake Oswego.  Interestingly, another architect, Simon G. Stanich (1920-1996), with Jacobberger Franks & Norman, lived in the house in at least 1962.  Likely longer, because nearby there is a very small park  with a monument, named for him because he was a community activist. 
 

The picture above was taken sometime around May 1981 and is from the City of Portland Historic Resources Inventory completed in 1984.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.