Thursday, December 13, 2018

Those Places Thursday: Four-Plex at 2703 NW Raleigh, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald T. Pape Design

Another bungalow four-plex designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1928, is this one, at the corner of NW Raleigh Street and NW 27th Avenue.




An August 19, 1928 article in the Portland Oregonian called "Apartment to be Built" said, "C. Jenkins is planning to erect a 1 and 1/2-story apartment house at 341 Twenty-seventh street North at an estimated cost of $14,000.  R. S. McFarland has been awarded the general contract.  Plans were drawn by E. T. Pape."  Here is the plumbing permit, dated August 24, 1928:




The "official" address later became 2703 NW Raleigh, although only one of the four units, pictured below, actually opens onto Raleigh.



This building is listed in the Portland Historic Resource Inventory and the Oregon Historic Sites Database.  Ewald designed the building with elements of the Tudor English Cottage style.  "Although a more vernacular adaptation of the style, the apartment displays characteristics of the style in its steeply-pitched cross-gable roof, stucco gable ends, asymmetrical massing, [double-hung wood sash] multi-pane windows, shallow boxed eaves, and brick construction."  The one-and-one-half storied structure also features two interior brick chimneys, trim board, panel entry doors, concrete steps with wrought-iron railings, one shingled dormer [on the north end], and sills with rowlock course.



Above and below - views along the NW 27th Avenue side of the building.



Above and below:  Entries for the units with the 1609, 1911, and 1613 NW 27th Avenue addresses.   


As for the interiors, according to recent ads, two of the units (2703 and 1613) have two bedrooms upstairs with high ceilings and are 1100 square feet; the other two units (1609 and 1611) have one bedroom and one bath.  All units have hardwood floors; dining areas with built-ins; kitchens including dishwashers; a "character-rich bath with tub, pedestal sink, and period honeycomb tile;" a spacious basement with washer, dryer, and tons of extra storage space; both a front and back door; and forced air gas heat.


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, December 9, 2018

Sentimental (Church Record) Sunday: St Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - Stained Glass, West Side

While visiting my son in Chicago, Illinois, in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, the interior in general, and the main altar (the High Altar of Angels), and the four other altars in or next to the sanctuary of the church.  This week is the first of two posts about the stained glass windows.  Click on all photos to make them larger.

The stained glass windows in the nave (the main part) of the church, five windows on each side, were added (along with the five altars) in 1902 for the parish's 50th anniversary.  Franz Mayer & Company from Munich, Germany, designed and produced the windows.   They used precious metals to enhance the rich colors: gold dust for red; cobalt for blue; uranium for green.  The figures in the scenes are dressed in Renaissance-style clothing.

The windows on the west side of the nave depict scenes from the life of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of  Jesus Christ, and are called the Marian Windows.  Closest to the entrance is the Presentation of Mary at the Temple.



This event was not mentioned in the Gospels, but is part of Roman Catholic tradition, as all children were presented at the temple in those times. Saints Anne and Joaquim (her parents) bring Mary for the presentation. At first, one might think this is the Biblical Presentation of Jesus at the Temple.  The stars in her halo indicate it is Mary (Jesus' halo is a cross signifying the crucifixion to come).  St. Anne (in brown) is an older woman, while Mary as Jesus' mother is always presented as young.




The next window, moving towards the sanctuary, illustrates the Annunciation.







God the Father and the Holy Spirit (in the form of a dove) appear at the upper right.  The angel Gabriel (pictured better here) carries lilies, a sign of Mary's purity, and there is a lily plant in the foreground.  Mary is kneeling on a prie-dieu, and her bare feet signify her humility (humus - "of the earth").  Behind Mary is a horizontal curtain, a symbol of her modesty.




Again, you can see the stars in Mary’s halo.




The center window on the west side is a triplet, representing the Assumption of Mary.  In the top half of the center window, Mary is rising up to the Holy Trinity (Jesus, his Father, and the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove), who hold her crown to make her Regina Coeli, Queen of Heaven.  Angels surround her, and are also in the top third of the two smaller windows to each side (pictured better here, here, and here).





In the lower half of the main window, apostles and disciples surround Mary’s grave, which is filled with lilies, signifying her purity.

St. Michael's Church [3 September 2014] / Sean Birmingham / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


At the bottom of the center panel are representations of two of the Four Evangelists, Saint Luke (his symbol is an ox or bull), and Saint John (who is represented by an eagle).



The next window depicts The Visitation of Mary to her cousin, Saint Elizabeth. as recorded in the Gospel of Luke, 1:39–56.  Both women are pregnant, Mary with Jesus and Elizabeth with John the Baptist.  The angel Gabriel (pictured better here) also appears in this window, as he brought the message to Elizabeth's husband Zacharias (in purple on the balcony) that he and his wife, childless and older, are now expecting.



Mary again is barefoot, reflecting her humility and that she is poor. It's not clear who the other man (in the hat) is - perhaps Saint Joseph, Mary's husband, as it would have been unlikely that she would have traveled alone.



The final window, closest to the Holy Family or Saint Joseph Altar, represents the Epiphany, when the Three Kings or Three Wise Men visited Mary and Joseph and the infant Jesus.  One of the two angels above the scene (pictured better here, although mislabeled as the Christmas Window) holds a banner that reads Gloria in Excelsis Deo.  You can also see the Star of Bethlehem.



St. Joseph (on the left) and shepherds (with sheep, on the right), watch....



...as Mary and Jesus receive gifts from the Three Kings.



© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Those Places Thursday: 3114 NE 36th Avenue, Portland, Oregon - An Ewald T. Pape Design

Here is another Mediterranean-style house designed by my architect first-cousin-twice-removed, Ewald Theodore Pape (1894-1976), in Portland, Oregon, in 1928.  This one is located up on a hill at 3114 NE 36th Avenue, and was a bit hard to photograph:



A better picture is this one, from the Portland Historic Resource Inventory, taken about May, 1980, when the vegetation around the house was not quite as large.


The inventory form says its special features and materials include a "gabled clay tile roof, wrought-iron balcony, round-headed window openings, leaded glass windows, and stucco exterior."  A May 1986 real estate ad describes it as a three-bedroom, two-bath house with a panoramic view, including a 20' by 40' deck.



In the Oregon Historic Sites Database, the house is named for Paul S. and Nina [D. Jones] Wiggins (marriage license referenced in The Sunday Oregonian, October 23, 1921, Section Two, Page 7), apparently the original owners.  In the 1928 city directory, he was the household sales manager for the Frigidaire Corporation, and she was a stenographer for M. Seller & Co.  They are at this address (then 674 E. 36th St. N.) in the 1929 directory, but by 1930, they have moved, and the criss-cross directory for that year shows someone else in the house.  Here is the May 10, 1928 plumbing permit, which shows C. S. Wiggins as the owner (probably a typo):



Another significant owner, according to the Portland Historic Resource Inventory, was H[arry] A. Gunhus, a manager with the Simonds Saw & Steel Company, who lived in the house with his wife June from at least 1943 to at least 1960.

In 2011, I was contacted by the then-current owners, who said they'd been there for 23 years, and offered a tour. I forgot on my trip to Portland this past summer to contact them to see if they were still willing to give me one - I hope to remember to do so the next time I am in Portland!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Sentimental (Church Record) Sunday: St Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - The Other Altars

While visiting my son in Chicago, Illinois, in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, the interior in general, and the main altar (the High Altar of Angels).  There are four other altars in or next to the sanctuary of the church.  Click on all photos to make them larger.

If you are facing the main altar, the first altar on the far right is the Our Mother of Perpetual Help Altar.  She is very special to the Redemptorists, the order of priests who serve this church.  I remember attending novenas to Our Mother of Perpetual Help with my father at a Redemptorist parish in Houston, Texas, when I was a young girl.

The altar was part of a display of altar building by E[gid] Hackner and Sons of La Crosse, Wisconsin, at the Chicago World’s Fair and Columbian Exposition of 1893.  It was purchased directly from the fairgrounds and erected at St. Michael’s on January 20, 1904.



The icon of Our Mother of Perpetual Help in the center is a replica of the original one, which survived the Chicago Fire of 1871 (thanks to parishioners taking it further north).  That original icon is one of the first four sent to the United States by the Redemptorists in Rome in 1870.

Two angels below the icon hold a banner that reads "Hail Mary Mother of Perpetual Help Pray for Us."  The angel standing at the far left holds a banner that reads "Regina Sanctorum Omnium" (Queen of All Saints).  The banner of the angel at the far right reads, "Regina Angelorum" (Queen of the Angels).



Below the table part of the altar is a scene with a painting of a man and a woman in the center, and two small angel statues on either side.  The words above them are “Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dom[inus] tecum,” the words of the angel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Annunciation:  "Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee."  It's not clear to me what the significance of the painting is.



The next altar to the left is the Family Altar or Saint Joseph Altar.  



In the center of it, Saint Joseph is holding his stepson, Jesus Christ.  To his right is Saint Joachim (the father of the Blessed Virgin Mary), and, to his left, the young Virgin Mary with her mother, Saint Anne.




There is an inset at the bottom of the altar depicting the death of Joseph, surrounded by Jesus and Mary.



The next altar, to the left of the High Altar of Angels as you look at it, is the Sacred Heart Altar.  It depicts Jesus with his Sacred Heart, as he appeared to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690).  The statues on either side of Jesus are of  St. Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787), founder of the Redemptorists, and St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582), founder of the Discalced Carmelites, a religious order of nuns.



Here's a close-up of this altar:

sacred heart of jesus [9 Aug 2009] / Via Tsuji / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


The final altar, on the far left as you face the sanctuary, is the Poor Souls Altar.  The carved imagery is of a soul being raised from purgatory to be united with Christ through the intercession of the priest at Mass.  You'll need to click on the photo below to see this and other details.

In the arch above the imagery are the Latin words "Domine Jesu Christe, rex gloriae," which translate to "Lord Jesus Christ, King of glory."

Just above the mostly-green mosaic-like images at the bases of the pedestals, on the left and the right, you can see two of the remaining light bulbs, of the original 2000, that decorated altars and various arches at one time. The other light bulbs were removed in 1952.



Underneath the altar tabletop is the carving below, with the Latin phrase "Liber scriptus proferetur, in quo totum continetur."  This is a line from the Latin hymn Dies irae (Day of Wrath).   The phrase roughly translates to "The written book will be brought forth, in which all is contained."



Next Sunday:  some of the stained glass windows!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Saturday, December 1, 2018

Happy 9th Blogiversary to ME!




© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Those Places Thursday: 1949 W. Lunt, Rogers Park, Chicago - John Pape's Home, ABT 1928-1937

This house, at 1949 W. Lunt in the Rogers Park area of Chicago, was the home of my paternal great-grandfather John Pape (1851-1945) from at least 1928 (but no earlier than 1925) to at least 1937 (but no later than 1939).  The 1236-square-foot house was built about 1904.  The photo below was taken in August 2017.



The 1910 Census shows a William Moore family renting the house.  By the 1920 Census, [Christian] Anthony D. Reimer was living in the house, along with his wife Hedwige A[gnes] and son (likely from a previous marriage) Oswald Christian Ursus Reimer.  Christian Anthony died in October 1922, and Hedwige Agnes continued to live in the house - it's her address when she was naturalized in June 1923.  Sometime between then and 1928, she and my widowed great-grandfather married.  She died in May 1937, and John (then age 85) moved sometime between then and 1940, when he appears on the Census living with his two youngest, single sons, Otto Richard "Dick" Pape and Walter Francis Pape, at 3648 N. Hoyne.


Above and below:  1949 W. Lunt, Chicago, September 2017.



Below:  Back side of 1949 W. Lunt, Rogers Park, Chicago, September 2017.



Interestingly, the house is right across the street from the small (less than one acre) Paschen Park, which opened on February 4,1929 - the day my father, Frederick Henry Pape, was born at the nearby St. Francis Hospital in south Evanston.

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Sentimental Church Record Sunday: St. Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - Main Altar

While visiting my son in Chicago in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to St. Michael Catholic Church in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors, and the interior in general.

Today I'm writing about the main altar in the sanctuary, the 56-foot High Altar of Angels (click on images to make them larger).  This altar (as well as the other four in the sanctuary) was carved from wood and painted in the Baroque style by E[gid] Hackner & Sons of La Crosse, Wisconsin, a noted producer of church altars, for the parish's 50th anniversary in 1902.



Near the top of the altar is an eight-foot tall statue of St. Michael the Archangel, which was carved by Andrew Gewont of Minnesota, also in 1902.  He is flanked by the angel Raphael (with the trumpet) to his right, and the angel Gabriel (holding a lily) on his left.

Michael is carrying a flaming sword and a shield with Quis ut Deus (Latin for "Who [is] like God?" and a literal translation of the name Michael) inscribed on it.  The scene shows Michael casting Satan (Lucifer, the devil) out of heaven.

These are the only three angels mentioned in the New Testament by name.  Gabriel means "strength of God," and Raphael means "remedy of God" or "God heals."



The photo below can be clicked on to view it much larger.  Note the many representations of angels throughout the altar, including all nine choirs of angels (Seraphim,  Cherubim - not the same as a cherub, and so on).

Closer to the bottom of the altar are a number of statues in niches flanking the tabernacle in the center.  The two larger statues are of Saint Peter (holding a key) and Saint Paul (holding a sword), and they were retained from the previous altar.  The four smaller statues (two each flanking Peter and Paul) are of the Four Evangelists,  Saints Matthew, Luke, Mark, and John, from left to right. These statues had been in the nave of the church before this altar was installed.

the altar [9 Aug 2009] / Via Tsuji / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0



Above:  the angel statue just below the statue of St. Paul.
Below:  The crucifix just above the golden tabernacle.



At the base of the High Altar of Angels, under the tabletop, is a carving of the Last Supper.  Made out of a single piece of wood by an unknown Italian artist, it was featured at the Italian Pavilion at Chicago’s 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. It was offered for sale after the fair, and St. Michael’s purchased it for this location.  A better image is here.



More about the other four altars in the front of the church next week!


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Thankful Thursday: Happy Thanksgiving!


decorated hayroll in Tolar, Texas, November 2018


© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Sentimental Church Record Sunday: St. Michael Catholic Church, Old Town, Chicago - Interior

While visiting my son in Chicago in August 2017, I was able to easily walk from the daylight basement apartment where we were staying in Lincoln Park to another Catholic church, St. Michael in Old Town.  I made a couple trips there over the week we were visiting.  So far I have written about the exterior and some of its details, as well as a family connection at the rectory doors.  Today I'll write about the interior in general.  Here's the dome just above the main altar (click on images to make them larger):



Here are photos looking down the main aisle of the church, toward the altar....

St. Michael's Church, 3 Sep 2014 / Sean Birmingham / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


...and toward the main door.

St. Michael's Church, 3 Sep 2014 / Sean Birmingham / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Here are some details of the painting in the dome above the main altar.  Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find out exactly who the artist was.  Records indicate interior decoration was done in 1883 by Karl Lambert of New York City, and in 1921 by A. Weinert of Milwaukee.  Between 1950-53, the church was redecorated. I don't think it was the prolific John Anton Mallin, as this church is not listed in his records.




I'm not quite sure why there is a Star of David symbol in the church.



The dove represents the Holy Spirit.



In the center of the church is another domed area with representations of the four Gospel writers, St. Matthew (a winged man), St. Mark (a winged lion), St. Luke (an ox or bull with wings), and St. John (an eagle), the Four Evangelists.



Next week:  the altars!

© Amanda Pape - 2018 - click here to e-mail me.